Parkinsons and CBD Oils

 

Patients turn to cannabis

It’s little wonder then that Parkinson’s sufferers and their families, desperate to slow down the course of the disease and ameliorate the life limiting symptoms, look towards other options. And while, to some, cannabis might seem like a medical wildcard, its use for the disease can be traced back to the 19th Century, where it was described in William Richard Gowers’s “Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System.”

Back then, very little was known about the chemical compounds in the plant.

Indeed, it’s only in the last twenty years that scientists have really begun to understand how cannabis affects the body with the discovery of the endocannabinoid system – the homeostatic regulator comprising a network of receptors (CB1 and CB2) and cannabis-like chemicals, found predominantly in the brain, central nervous and immune system.

The area of the brain affected by Parkinson’s, the basal ganglia, has a high density of CB1 receptors and in experimental Parkinson’s models scientists have observed increased CB1 activity in this brain region. Greater CB2 receptor expression has also been noted in the brain’s glial cells, as well as an overall increase in endocannabinoid production.

Researchers have already seen that botanical cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant can have a direct impact on the endocannabinoid system. It’s no surprise then that an exciting area of research into combating neurodegenerative disease is the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic tools.

 

Key to your decision should be finding CBD oils that are extracted from organic hemp, using state-of-the-art Supercritical CO2 methods. This ensures you that the CBD oil is both free from solvents and that the active compounds like cannabinoids and terpenes are preserved.

Effects of cannabidiol in the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease: an exploratory double-blind trial.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237116

Patent No. 6630507, held by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, covers the use of cannabinoids for treating a wide range of diseases.

Under U.S. federal law, marijuana is defined as having no medical use. So it might come as a surprise to hear that the government owns one of the only patents on marijuana as a medicine.

The patent (US6630507) is titled “Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants” and was awarded to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in October 2003.

It was filed four years earlier, in 1999, by a group of scientists from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

The government’s patent does not cover THC, the main ingredient in marijuana. On the other hand, cannabidiol (CBD) is specifically mentioned as an example of a cannabinoid that is covered. The patent describes CBD and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids as superior when taken in higher doses.

“Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses.”

According to the description, CBD can be ingested in very large amounts without side effects.

“No signs of toxicity or serious side effects have been observed following chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers, even in large acute doses of 700mg/day.”

The patent explains that cannabidiol previously had not been considered useful as a neuroprotectant. However, it cites various studies on cannabidiol as an antiepileptic and as a potential treatment for glaucoma.

Other great reads on the Cannabis Conspiracy

https://www.denverpost.com/2016/08/28/what-is-marijuana-patent-6630507/

https://www.bing.com/search?q=truth+is+goverments+have+owned+patent+cbd+oil+for+years&form=EDGEAR&qs=PF&cvid=0f8f429236894cada918eea8e5390bc5&cc=GB&setlang=en-US&PC=LCTS

Massage Therapy Benefits

I have been trained in Massage therapy since 2005 in both Remedial and Swedish Massage.

Virtually every system of the body is affected by massage, either directly or indirectly.

Here is a guide to how your body can benefit.

The skeletal system: Bone is affected indirectly by massage. Improved circulation of blood brings oxygen and nutrients to the bones. Joint stiffness and pain can be reduced. As the muscles become more flexible, joint movement increases.

The muscular system: Some massage movements relax and stretch muscles, reducing muscular tension and cramp. Massage also makes muscles more flexible by reducing muscle tone. Muscles tired by exercise are more quickly restored by massage than by rest.

The nervous system: Soothing massage can provide relief from nervous irritability and stress-related conditions such as insomnia and tension headaches. When used energetically to stimulate, massage may relieve lethargy and fatigue.

Circulation system: Massage

can improve the flow of blood, which can help poor circulation. This is especially useful for anyone who is immobile.

Lymphatic system: Gentle massage stimulates the lymphatic system, which helps clear the body of a build-up of waste products. The relaxing effect of the massage can relieve stress, which in turn can boost the immune system.

Respiratory system: As you become more relaxed during a massage, respiration may become slower and deeper as you are using your diaphragm for breathing and expending less energy. Physiotherapists use cupping movements over the base of the lungs to relieve chest congestion.

Digestive system: Massage aids relaxation and therefore can help to increase the movement of food and waste products through the digestive system. This relaxation can have a balancing effect on the digestive system.

Urinary system: Waste products that have been released during massage find their way via the blood to the kidneys where they may be filtered out and eliminated.

Female reproductive system: Menstrual problems such as period pains and PMS can be alleviated by the relaxing effects of massage, as can menopausal symptom

Different Methods of Taking CBD

CBD, a non-psychoactive chemical in cannabis, seems to generate new studies every day claiming a new usage. It can be difficult for consumers to make sense of the products they find advertised online and at their local dispensary, and even more difficult to decide which is right for them.

With CBD suddenly being touted in food products and cosmetics, in the form of different oils, crystals, e-liquids and teas, it’s no surprise many are confused by it all. To help make sense of so many options, we’ve created a guide to some of the most common CBD products available.

CBD-rich oil

How it’s made:

CBD-rich oil is a specific oil that contains CBD and doesn’t contain THC. CBD-rich oil is obtained via extraction made from cannabis flowers, most of the times from hemp strains rich in CBD. Then this extract can be mixed with hemp seed oil, olive oil or other types of oil to facilitate ingestion. These CBD-rich oil products are non-psychoactive.

It is important to know the difference between CBD oil and Hemp seed oil.
Hemp seed oil is a hemp extract taken from the seeds of the plant. Industrial hemp is the only plant used for this type of hemp oil. The seeds of the hemp plant can be cold pressed, peeled or unpeeled (preferably cold), to create a delicious oil. There are no cannabinoids such as THC or CBD present in the oil since hemp seeds are not psychoactive. Hemp oil is legal in most countries and can be found in food markets, together with more common types of oil, like olive oil.


Image result for cbd oil and how to take it
How you use it:

CBD-rich oil can be consumed in many ways. Users looking for the strongest effect from the oil can take it directly by placing a drop on or under the tongue so the oil is absorbed through the mouth and digestive tract. Others who want to enjoy the experience of consumption may choose to add a drop of oil to cooking or baked goods or dissolve a drop in their smoothie or tea.

Hemp seed oil can be found in food markets, together with more common types of oil, like olive oil. Hemp seed oil is known for its great taste and for it’s high values of unsaturated fats, such as Omega 3 and Omega 6.  It can be used in Many different applications such as  Lotions or soaps, a base for plastics, instead of petroleum and eco-friendly paints.

CBD Crystals

How they’re made:

After hemp oil is removed from the plant, it can be further refined to isolate only CBD. To isolate pure CBD crystals, extracted hemp oil is put through a ‘winterisation’ process- or slowly heated to remove fats and lipids. Then, a machine called a rotary evaporator is used to remove any remaining plant traces. The final product is decarboxylated through another meticulous heating process to activate the cannabinoids, making chemicals bioavailable for consumers.

 

How you use it:

CBD crystals give consumers more versatility than oil. Like hemp oil, they can be added to foods, dissolved in drinks or swallowed whole, but unlike oil, crystals can also be ‘dabbed’  like cannabis concentrates (a manual vaporization method) made into an e-liquid, or sprinkled over a cigarette or joint.

Pros and cons:

Because crystals are more highly concentrated than other forms of CBD—up to 99.8% in some cases, they produce a more immediate effect than other methods of consuming it. On the downside, isolating only one cannabinoid removes a variety of terpenes from the final product.

 

Methods of ingestion are entirely up to the user’s preference. Different methods could have different effects on one person to another based on their personal taste.

For users looking for an easy use, we recommend our wide range of CBD e-liquids, which are available in different strengths to suit your needs. For consumers looking for the highest-impact product available, pure CBD crystals may be the best option. For those simply wanting to explore the use of CBD in their normal diet, hemp oil may have the best overall benefits. CBD tea is best suited for consumers who simply want a flavourful tea.

CBD E-Liquids

How it’s made:

CBD e-liquids are CBD products designed for use in e-cigarettes or vaporisers. Many manufacturers start with pure CBD crystals in order to precisely measure the CBD dosage, combining them with vegetable glycerin and propylene glycol. High-quality e-liquid producers also add terpenes, (aromatic compounds from the cannabis plant) back into the e-liquid at the end of the process to enhance flavour.

How you use it:

CBD e-liquids can be used in place of nicotine e-liquids in any standard e-cigarette or portable vaporiser. Simply add the e-liquid to the tank of your vape and follow the device’s instructions to inhale the vapour. Prepared e-liquid cartridges are also available for e-cigarette models that don’t allow for manual refills.

Pros and cons:

E-cigarettes have become a huge trend. They are convenient and discreet when travelling and allow users to ‘vape’ in places where they were previously not allowed to smoke, like inside public buildings or at the office. Dosages in this form can vary, producers often offer different strengths of CBD e-liquids for different user preferences. This is the most affordable, direct and convenient option for a majority of consumers.

CBD Tea

How it’s made:

CBD tea is made simply by drying the leaves and buds of CBD-rich hemp plants. Like other cannabinoids, CBD extracts from the plant and binds to fats during any heating process. To get the best effect the tea should be brewed for several minutes with some type of fat like milk, cream, or coconut oil. Without fat included in brewing, users will only get the benefits of antioxidants, fatty acids and the tea’s sweet, subtle flavour rather than active cannabinoids.

How to use it:

To get the full flavour of hemp tea, brew tea in hot water with milk, cream or coconut oil for 5 minutes or more. Dried hemp tea leaves can also be used as a replacement for loose rolling tobacco when making cigarettes or joints.

Pros and cons:

Because raw dried hemp leaves have not gone through processes to activate the chemicals they contain, the cannabinoids in hemp tea are less ‘bioavailable’, meaning the user will feel a much weaker overall effect compared to other methods.

 

 

Cold Showers – More than just uncomfortable

After reading about Wim Hoff – the ice man and discovering that elite athletes such as Ben Greenfield take cold showers I decided that I too would give it a go.  Goodbye long beautiful, warm drenched sing in the shower to my favourite music, Hello agonising Screams and my own motivational shouts at myself – I can do this, I am out my comfort zone and it feels amazing.  I don’t believe a word of my shouts and screams but there is too many benefits of this cold shower to wimp out on the first day so I continue each morning.  I visualise myself as David Goggins (google him) and when the freezing cold hits my hair and sends freezing shivers all over my body I am no longer myself but a warrior braving the elements in order to save myself from the enemies.  Yes I do a lot of visualisation, I have little kids..ITS ALL I DO….

benefits of regular cold shower application:
– activation the sympathetic nervous system (Shevchuk, 2008)
– increased blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and increased synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well (Shevchuk, 2008)
– electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect (Shevchuk, 2008)
– significant analgesic effect without noticeable side effects or causing dependence (Shevchuk, 2008)
– reduction in muscle soreness after running a marathon (Liang et al, 2001)
– improved quality of sleep (Onen et al, 1994)
– decrease of uric acid level in blood plasma (Brenke et al, 1994)
– inhibition of purine metabolism (Brenke et al, 1994)
– long-term antioxidative adaptation (Brenke et al, 1994)
– improved tone of the skin and muscles (Mergeay et al, 1990)
– reduction in uremic pruritus (a major problem for patients with end-stage renal disease) (Zucker et al, 2003)
increase in brown fat cells, which protect from aging; fight obesity, diabetes, and heart disease (Kanzleiter et al,2005; Mattson, 2010).

I also heard it was great for your hair so This is what swayed me to give it a go….

Anyway I cant say I enjoy it, but it definitely sets me up for the day and I do have to a

admit I feel more energised and ready to tackle my mountains of housework.

 

 

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Box Breathing – If its good enough for Navy Seals…

Navy Seals train hard and not just on their bodies but on their minds too.  They have to be able to stay calm in the most frightening of situations.  What if we could learn to do it to so that we can better handle our emotions and our busy over active minds.

Well with practice we can and it is all down to our breathing.  When we are frightened or angry our breathing naturally becomes more rapid and shallow which causes fight or flight response and the more we do this the more we are likely to develop chronic illnesses brought on by this stress response.

Here is how Box Breathing or four square Breathing works

 

Before you get started, make sure that you’re seated upright in a comfortable chair with your feet flat on the floor. Try to be an a stress-free, quiet environment where you can focus on your breathing. Keeping your hands relaxed in your lap with your palms facing up, focus on your posture. You should be sitting up straight. This will help you take deep breaths.

When you’re ready, start with step 1.

Step 1

Sitting upright, slowly exhale, getting all the oxygen out of your lungs. Focus on this intention and be conscious of what you’re doing.

Step 2

Inhale slowly and deeply through your nose to the count of four. In this step, count to four very slowly in your head. Feel the air fill your lungs, one section at a time, until your lungs are completely full and the air moves into your abdomen.

Step 3

Hold your breath for another slow count of four.

Step 4

Exhale through your mouth for the same slow count of four, expelling the air from your lungs and abdomen. Be conscious of the feeling of the air leaving your lungs.

Step 5

Hold your breath for the same slow count of four before repeating this process.

 

Practice anywhere and throughout the day as often as you like or just before you know you are going to feel nervous and this will help to calm you down.

 

See the source image

Buteyko Breathing

Listening to Ben Greenfield at A fest give out some amazing hacks from ancient snd modern science about how to live life at an optimal level and one of his many many strategies is Buteyko Breathing.

So I started researching and practicing this type of breathing.

Bullet Proof Dave asprey had Buteyko therapist and author Patrick Mckeown on his podcast talking and demonstrating the techniques. It was such a fascinating podcast.

In the 1950s, Russian scientist Dr. Konstantin Buteyko identified over 150 disorders which could be resolved by normalising the breathing, and spent the next three decades developing breathiing exercises and strategies to achieve this.

The Buteyko Method of breathing re-training has now been taught over the past 20 years as a highly effective, drug-free education process which helps normalise and improve the breathing, reducing the symptoms of many common disorders. By learning the method, you can experience the medical benefits already enjoyed by thousands of people worldwide:

upto 70% less coughing, breathlessness & wheezing

reduced need for medication

improved sleep and quality of life

enhanced ability for exercise

How to do it?

A useful tool with Buteyko breathing is a simple concept called the control pause. The control pause provides feedback about your relative breathing volume. To obtain an accurate measurement, please rest for 10 minutes before measuring.

  1. Take a small, silent breath in through your nose and allow a small silent breath out through your nose.
  2. Hold your nose with your fingers to prevent air from entering your lungs.
  3. Count the number of seconds until you feel the first definite desire to breathe.
  4. At the first definite desire to breathe in, you may also feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles. Your tummy may jerk and the area around your neck may contract.
  5. Your inhalation at the end of the breath should be calm.
  6. Release your nose and breathe in through it.

Remember that taking your control pause entails holding your breath only until you feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles, or the first stress of your body telling you to “breathe.” If you had to take a big breath at the end of the breath hold, then you held your breath for too long.

A very good control pause amounts to 40 seconds, and a good control pause amounts to 30 seconds. A control pause of 25 seconds indicates room for improvement, while a control pause of 15 seconds or less is indicative of symptoms such as respiratory complaints (asthma, wheezing, coughing, chest tightness or nasal problems), sleep disordered breathing (insomnia, fatigue, snoring, or obstructive sleep apnea) or anxiety complaints (excessive worrying, high stress levels, poor concentration) or any other condition resulting from chronic overbreathing. The significance of the control pause for asthma is explained in the video below.

The good news is that you will feel better each time your control pause increases by five seconds, and the first step to increase your control pause is to learn to breathe through your nose both day and night.

https://buteykoclinic.com/team_members/patrick-mckeown/