Dan Milman – The Four Purposes of Life

“Where are you? … HERE”
“What time is it? … NOW”
“What are you? … THIS MOMENT.”

Just watching Dan Millman on the Four Purposes of Life on Gaia.com and he has some great insights to how we travel throughout our life.  I love his books and need to just re read them all the time so I can have these golden nuggets of wisdom sink into my brain.  Some of the following are the lessons I have learned from Dan so far.

Its fine to dream BIG but start small and take small steps at a time.  So if you want to start meditating then start with just a few minutes a day.  A little of something is better than a lot of nothing.

What is my Purpose?? – There are four of them – Career (Income) *Our Calling – Do what you love * (Time stands still or speeds up) Our life path or Hidden Calling – (our calling is what we may have pushed back) * attending to this arising moment.

 

While experience and wisdom is important, in the Way of the Peaceful Warrior, Socrates teaches Dan that there’s a difference between Knowing and Doing. You can know what to do or understand something, but you don’t really KNOW it until you’re DOING it.

I can relate to this with my meditation practice and my reiki healing practice.  Sometimes I can sit and read and reread and write out plans etc but without the practice then it really means very little.  Recently I enrolled in a raw food course and wrote out a lot of recipes and shopping lists and was so pumped about starting this journey.  But after a few days I was back to eating cooked processed foods so I started to read up again and watch youtube videos on raw food all whilst eating cooked food and feeling so deflated and disappointed in myself.  So this in my life is teaching me that I can read as much as I like but without putting it into practice it does not bring me inner joy or contentment.

A big theme in the Way of the Peaceful Warrior that Socrates instills in Dan is the power of NOW. The only time that matters is RIGHT NOW, this moment.  This moment is all that we have. Yesterday is gone, and tomorrow doesn’t exist. But, the problem with most people is that we live in our heads. We live in either the past or the future.

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All stress and fear exists in either the past or the future. In fact, fear is just anticipation of pain. If you can truly live in the moment and get out of your head, you can be free of all of the garbage in your head and perform at levels you never thought possible. Not only that, but you can be at peace.

Peaceful Warrior Dan Millman

Being in the moment is a practice. It’s a practice that Dan focuses on throughout the book that changes his life for the better. He shares his experiences learning meditation and learning to be more and more present. There’s one part in the book where Socrates throws Dan over a bridge into the water, just to clear his mind. He then describes to Dan how there are no ordinary moments – that there is never nothing going on.  The truth is, there is so many amazing things going on at any given moment, but we’re too much inside of our heads to notice it.

 

See the source image

 

 

The lesson here is simple: nothing in your outer world will ever make you happy or fulfilled. Happiness can only come from the inside. When you truly come to this realization and stop deluding yourself, you can gain that sense of peace and satisfaction within.

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Friendships go a lot deeper than we think.

Dr joe dispenza recent blog re friendship and how our close relationships with our friends can go a lot more deeper than we think.

 

A recent study published in Nature Communications suggests the brains of close friends respond in remarkably similar ways. The study was conducted by having two groups of people—some friends and others not friends—view a series of short videos. While viewing the videos, and at the same time having their brains scanned, the results of the friend groups were startling. It turns out they shared the same ebbs and swells of attention and distraction, the same peaks of reward processing at certain parts of the videos, and the same levels of boredom in response to others. The neural response patterns evoked amongst friends proved so similar (versus the patterns witnessed among people who were not friends) that over time, the researchers could predict the strength of two people’s social bond based on their brain scans alone.

 

To read his full blog post click below

https://www.drjoedispenza.com/blog/general/good-friends-are-all-about-good-chemistry/

This is why doing the meditations daily is vital to creating your new future. Every time you meditate you change your brain and body to be greater than your environment. When we makes these changes enough times, we no longer belong to the past—we belong to the future. Is it possible then that when you change your brain to become greater than your environment you will begin meeting new people and creating new relationships with people who share a new brain frequency? Now that’s evolution.

Kyle Cease – brings comedy to consciousness

Omg where the helk has this guy been hiding or have I simply not been in alignment with him or am I only ready now to hear his words.

So I’ve been meditating for few years now and slowly uncovering all the darkness within me and bringing it into the light. It’s not easy confronting fears, even the ones I made up in my head which is practically all of them.

Eckharte tolle the power of now opened up my eyes to my journey into developing my consciousness and mindfulness practice along with Jon kabat zinn work on MBSR.

But Kyle Cease seems to combine all these teachings with great humour. There is so many AHA moments followed by laughter and then some more self realisation.

I am just so grateful that I am finding these truly amazing people and their words are like gold.

Please, if you are into developing your inner self and wanting to know more about the mind and well life in general then listen to this guy.. I can’t even explain how fantastic he really is.

Mindful Breathing

Mindfulness Breathing

Breathing is something that we all do, all of the time – yet we are often not aware of how it feels in the moment. By bringing our focus intentionally onto the breath we can ground ourselves in what is happening right now.

We can practice observing without reacting, experiencing each breath as it happens without feeling a need to change it.

You can do this exercise for just a few minutes, or for longer periods. Although the intention is to focus on the breath, you will begin to experience how unfocused our minds can be!

You may find that your mind wanders a hundred times, or just a few. It is okay for this to happen and it doesn’t mean that you are doing anything wrong. When you notice your mind has wandered, gently but firmly bring your attention back to the breath.

Mindfulness of breath

Preparation

Sit or lie in a comfortable position. You may choose to close your eyes or keep them open, if you are feeling tired it may be useful to let just a little bit of light in to keep you alert.

The Breath

Begin by gently moving your attention onto the process of breathing. Notice the sensations of each breath as it happens, whether you focus on the rise and fall of your chest or abdomen, or on the feeling of the breath at the nostrils. Really feel what it is like to breath, just observing it as it happens.

As you engage in this exercise you may find that your mind wanders, caught by thoughts or by noises in the room, or bodily sensations. When you notice that this happens, know that this is okay, and simply notice the distraction but gently bring your attention back to the breath.

Ending the exercise

Take a few moments to yourself, connecting with your experience in the present moment. Expand your awareness from the breath into the space around you, and as you feel comfortable to do so, opening your eyes and bringing the exercise to a close.

Reflections

Take a few moments to think about what your experience was in this exercise, and how you feel in the present moment.

Being Now is not as easy as it sounds

When I watch my kids and their friends play together I am just so amazed and in awe of their total immersion in the world of imagination. They laugh so hard at the imaginery pet frog leaping over the couch. They fall out with their friends at the drop of a hat yet when it’s time for their friends to go home they don’t want them to leave. They forget so quickly about the arguments and focus completely on the games they are playing. I am always so envious at this instinctive behaviour. There is no thought of tomorrow, they have no sense of time and no responsibility.

I practice being now, I even have Be now tattoo’d upon my hand to remind me but I am still not quite there yet!!Which again is totally contradictory as if I was being Now then I am here and this is now.

Meditation and slow breathing is my go to for being now. I use my daily reiki precepts to remind myself to focus on today and my mindfulness to gain control of my now.

It’s definitely a journey and I am slowly but surely releasing my need to be chasing my destination.

Oh to be a child again….#lovelittlepeople

Script for Mountain Meditation

Guided Mountain Meditation
Sit with a straight back, your head held erect on your neck and shoulders, allow the shoulders to fully relax. And place your hands on your knees.
Close your eyes and bring your attention to the flow of your breathing. Feeling each inbreath and each outbreath. Just observing your breathing without trying to change it or regulate it in any way. Allowing the body to be still. And sitting with a sense of dignity, a sense of resolve, a sense of being complete, whole, in this very moment, with your posture reflecting this sense of wholeness.
And as you sit here, picturing in your mind’s eye as best you can the most beautiful mountain that you know or have seen or can imagine. Just holding the image and feeling of this mountain in your mind’s eye, letting it gradually come into greater focus. Observing its overall shape, its lofty peak high in the sky, the large base rooted in the rock of the earth’s crust, its steep or gently sloping sides. Noticing how massive it is, how solid, how unmoving, how beautiful both from afar and up close.
Perhaps your mountain has snow at the top and trees on the lower slopes. Perhaps it has one prominent peak, perhaps a series of peaks or a high plateau. Whatever its shape or appearance, just sitting and breathing with the image of this mountain. Observing it, noticing its qualities and when you feel ready, seeing if you can bring the mountain into your own body so that the body sitting here and the mountain in your mind’s eye become one. So that as you sit here you share in the massiveness and the stillness and majesty of the mountain. You become the mountain rooted in the sitting posture, your head becomes the lofty peak, supported by the rest of the body. Your shoulders and arms the sides of the mountain. Your buttocks and legs the solid base rooted to your chair. Experiencing in your body a sense of uplift from deep within your pelvis and spine, with each breath as you continue sitting, becoming a little more a breathing mountain, unwavering in your stillness, completely what you are, beyond words and thought. A centred, rooted, unmoving presence.
Now as you sit here becoming aware of the fact that as the sun travels across the sky, the light and shadows and colours are changing virtually moment by moment. Night follows day and day follows night. A canopy of stars, the moon, then the sun. Through it all, the mountain just sits, experiencing change in each moment. Constantly changing, yet always just being itself. It remains still as the seasons flow into one another and as the weather changes, moment by moment, and day by day. Calmness abiding all change.
In summer, there’s no snow on the mountain except perhaps for the very peaks. In fall, the mountain may wear a coat of brilliant fire colours. In winter, a blanket of snow and ice. In any season, it may find itself at times enshrouded in clouds or fog or pelted by freezing rain. People may come to see the mountain and comment on how beautiful it is or on how it’s not a good day to see the mountain. None of this matters to the mountain which remains at all times its essential self. Clouds may come, and clouds may go. The mountain’s magnificence and beauty are not changed one bit by the way people see it or not or by the weather. Seen or unseen, in sun or clouds, broiling or frigid, day or night, it just sits, being itself. At times, visited by violent storms, buffeted by snow and rain and winds of unthinkable magnitude. Through it all, the mountain continues to sit unmoved by the weather, by what happens on the surface, by the world of appearances.
And in the same way, as we sit in meditation, we can learn to experience the mountain. We can embody the same unwavering stillness and rootedness in the face of everything that changes in our own lives over seconds, over hours, over years. In our lives and in our meditation practice, we constantly experience the changing nature of mind and body and of the outer world. We have our own periods of light and darkness, our moments of colour and our moments of drabness. Certainly, we experience storms of varying intensity and violence in the outer world and in our own minds and bodies. We endure periods of darkness and pain, as well as the moments of joy. Even our appearance changes constantly, experiencing a weather of its own.
By becoming the mountain in our meditation practice, we can link up with its strength and stability and adopt it for our own. We can use its energies to support our energy to encounter each moment with mindfulness and equanimity and clarity. It may help us to see that our thoughts and feelings, our preoccupations, our emotional storms and crises, even the things that happen to us, are very much like the weather on the mountain. We tend to take it all personally but its strongest characteristic is impersonal. The weather of our own lives is not to be ignored or denied. It is to be encountered, honoured, felt, known for what it is and held in awareness. And in holding it in this way, we come to know a deeper silence, and stillness, and wisdom. Mountains have this to teach us and much more if we can come to listen.
Reference: Mindfulness Meditation, CD Series 2, Jon Kabat-Zinn

Script for Awareness of Breath

Awareness of Breath

This guided meditation on the breath will help you learn to simply be and to look within yourself with mindfulness and equanimity. Allow yourself to switch from the usual mode of doing to a mode of non-doing. Of simply being. Sitting in an erect posture, either on a straight back chair or on a cushion. As you allow your body to become still, bring your attention to the fact that you are breathing. And become aware of the movement of your breath as it comes into your body and as it leaves your body. Not manipulating the breath in any way or trying to change it. Simply being aware of it and of the feelings associated with breathing. And observing the breath deep down in your belly. Feeling the abdomen as it expands gently on the in breath, and as it falls back towards your spine on the outbreath. Being totally here in each moment with each breath. Not trying to do anything, not trying to get any place, simply being with your breath. Giving full care and attention to each inbreath and to each outbreath. As they follow one after the other in a never ending cycle and flow.
You will find that from time to time your mind will wander off into thoughts. When you notice that your attention is no longer here and no longer with your breathing, and without judging yourself, bring your attention back to your breathing and ride the waves of your breathing, fully conscious of the duration of each breath from moment to moment. Every time you find your mind wandering off the breath, gently bringing it back to the present, back to the moment-to-moment observing of the flow of your breathing. Using your breath as an anchor to focus your attention, to bring you back to the present whenever you notice that your mind is becoming absorbed or reactive. Using your breath to help you tune into a state of relaxed awareness and stillness.
Now as you observe your breathing, you may find from time to time that you are becoming aware of sensations in your body. As you maintain awareness of your breathing, see if it is possible to expand the field of your awareness so that it includes a sense of your body as a whole as you sit here. Feeling your body, from head to toe, and becoming aware of all the sensations in your body. So that now you are observing not only the flow of breathing, but the sense of your body as a whole.
Being here with whatever feelings and sensations come up in any moment without judging them, without reacting to them, just being fully here, fully aware. Totally present with whatever your feelings are and with your breath and a sense of your body as a whole. And again whenever you notice that your mind wandering off, just bringing it back to your breathing and your body as you sit here not going anywhere, not doing anything just simply being, simply sitting. Moment to moment, being fully present, fully with yourself.
Reestablishing your awareness on the body as a whole and on the breath as it moves in and out of your body. Coming back to a sense of fullness of each inbreath, and the fullness of each outbreath. If you find yourself at any point drawn into a stream of thinking and you notice that you are no longer observing the breath, just using your breathing and the sense of your body to anchor you and stabilize you in the present.
Just being with your breathing from moment to moment, just sitting in stillness, looking for nothing and being present to all. Just as it is, just as it unfolds. Just being right here, right now. Complete. Human. Whole.

As the practice comes to an end, you might give yourself credit for having spent this time nourishing yourself in a deep way by dwelling in this state of non-doing, in this state of being. For having intentionally made time for yourself to simply be who you are. And as you move back into the world, allow the benefits of this practice to expand into every aspect of your life.
Reference: Mindfulness Meditation, CD Series 1, Jon Kabat-Zinn