Buteyko Breathing

Breathing Techniques

Listening to Ben Greenfield at A fest give out some amazing hacks from ancient snd modern science about how to live life at an optimal level and one of his many many strategies is Buteyko Breathing.

So I started researching and practicing this type of breathing.

Bullet Proof Dave asprey had Buteyko therapist and author Patrick Mckeown on his podcast talking and demonstrating the techniques. It was such a fascinating podcast.

In the 1950s, Russian scientist Dr. Konstantin Buteyko identified over 150 disorders which could be resolved by normalising the breathing, and spent the next three decades developing breathiing exercises and strategies to achieve this.

The Buteyko Method of breathing re-training has now been taught over the past 20 years as a highly effective, drug-free education process which helps normalise and improve the breathing, reducing the symptoms of many common disorders. By learning the method, you can experience the medical benefits already enjoyed by thousands of people worldwide:

upto 70% less coughing, breathlessness & wheezing

reduced need for medication

improved sleep and quality of life

enhanced ability for exercise

How to do it?

A useful tool with Buteyko breathing is a simple concept called the control pause. The control pause provides feedback about your relative breathing volume. To obtain an accurate measurement, please rest for 10 minutes before measuring.

  1. Take a small, silent breath in through your nose and allow a small silent breath out through your nose.
  2. Hold your nose with your fingers to prevent air from entering your lungs.
  3. Count the number of seconds until you feel the first definite desire to breathe.
  4. At the first definite desire to breathe in, you may also feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles. Your tummy may jerk and the area around your neck may contract.
  5. Your inhalation at the end of the breath should be calm.
  6. Release your nose and breathe in through it.

Remember that taking your control pause entails holding your breath only until you feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles, or the first stress of your body telling you to “breathe.” If you had to take a big breath at the end of the breath hold, then you held your breath for too long.

A very good control pause amounts to 40 seconds, and a good control pause amounts to 30 seconds. A control pause of 25 seconds indicates room for improvement, while a control pause of 15 seconds or less is indicative of symptoms such as respiratory complaints (asthma, wheezing, coughing, chest tightness or nasal problems), sleep disordered breathing (insomnia, fatigue, snoring, or obstructive sleep apnea) or anxiety complaints (excessive worrying, high stress levels, poor concentration) or any other condition resulting from chronic overbreathing. The significance of the control pause for asthma is explained in the video below.

The good news is that you will feel better each time your control pause increases by five seconds, and the first step to increase your control pause is to learn to breathe through your nose both day and night.

https://buteykoclinic.com/team_members/patrick-mckeown/

Need a Good Sleep??

mind hacking

I am the worst sleeper then I am the best then I suck again and it can last for months. I’ve learnt over the years not to let it bother me through meditation. But I like the way I feel after a good night sleep so I started to investigate and research ways to hack my sleep.

I found this great podcast and blog post by Ben Greenfield who goes into depth on hacking your sleep and why it is so important to get a good sleep.

Check out his full post here

The main problems I find with my sleep are – my phone and my phone and yes u guessed it…my bloody phone.

If I go on it after 9pm and get caught up messaging people, emailing and speaking to clients etc then I know my sleep is gonna be poor. My mind is on over drive and I am full of ideas and definitely not ready for bed.

Top Tips –

  • TURN PHONE OFF AT 9PM
  • Meditate before bed or some Yin Yoga
  • Darkened room or eye mask.
  • Listen to some binaural beats for sleep or I actually prefer a sleep hypnosis.
  • Magnesium supplement
  • Cbd Oil
  • Plus melatonin spray
  • keep your room cool at about 18 degree

Day time – Ben takes this other Chinese herbal supplement I haven’t heard of but reading up on it I want it. TIAN CHI?

He has cold showers in the morning and has a cool suit when working out but read his blog for the reasons why this all helps.

He must spend a fortune on gadgets and monitors his sleep with various apps.

I am gonna try out all the cheaper options for getting a good sleep and hopefully my sleep will get better. TRY ONE AT A TIME AND SEE WHAT WORKS BEST.

For me I have found that meditation good food and certain supplements to get a good sleep. SEE WHAT WORKS FOR YOU.

Diaphragmatic Breathing

Breathing Techniques

Diaphragmatic breathing, sometimes called belly breathing, is a deep breathing technique that engages your diaphragm, a dome-shaped sheet of muscle at the bottom of your ribcage that is primarily responsible for respiratory function.

 

To try it, bring one hand above your belly button and one hand at your heart. Close your eyes and take a few deep, full breaths, allowing your hands to move out and up slightly with the inhale and move back in with the exhale. When the diaphragm moves naturally with your breath, a lot of seemingly magical things happen. Here are just some of the benefits of belly breathing or diaphragmatic breathing from a physiological perspective.

1.) Helps Our Respiratory System to Work Most Efficiently

Have you ever watched a baby or your dog or cat breathe? What do you notice? Probably a lot of 3-dimensional expansive movement around the abdomen and whole body. Our breath should naturally move us, and it did—before society trained us to breathe inefficiently.

What were we told as we got older? Suck it in and squeeze your belly. We wore tight clothes that restrict breathing. As we get older, many of us unintentionally trained ourselves out of the most efficient and natural method of breathing—diaphragmatic.

With poor breathing habits, gas exchange is not efficient. This means that our cells are not getting the nutrients they need at the best rate. When trillions of cells are not happy, we can feel unhappy, with lethargy and brain fog in the short term, along with chronic health problems in the long term. Retraining ourselves to breathe with the diaphragm more can lead to natural vitality and well-being.

2.) Stimulates the Relaxation Response

The “relaxation response” refers to the turning on of the parasympathetic nervous system. This also turns off the overactive sympathetic nervous system (a.k.a fight or flight, or the “stress response”). Deep breaths are our only access to this autonomic nervous system, which automatically makes our heart beat and food digest most efficiently.

By developing the capacity to choose the relaxation response over the stress response MORE often, we can calm anxiety and lower the risk of stress-related conditions like heart disease, digestive disorders, sleep disorders, depression, and more.

In particular, you can initiate the relaxation response by practicing deep, diaphragmatic breaths with elongated exhales.

Go ahead and try it now: This time, put both hands right above your belly button near your lower ribs and diaphragm. Take 5 deep breaths with a 3-second inhale and 6-second exhale. Feel the movement under your hands. Do you feel the profound difference from that simple exercise?

3.) Relieves Pain

By using breathing techniques like diaphragmatic breathing, we can help relieve pain in the short term and lower the likelihood of flares in the long term.

4.) Gently Stretches and Tones Core Muscles, Including the Pelvic Floor

The core muscles mainly include the abdominals, erector back muscles (the muscles that keep us tall and erect), diaphragm, and pelvic floor.  When we breathe, that natural three-dimensional movement of the body helps keep the muscles in the area healthy.

5.) Improves Posture

In order to do diaphragmatic breathing properly, you have to sit tall. This allows all of your organ systems to work more efficiently. You digest your food better, your heart pumps more efficiently, your nerves and blood vessels are less likely to get pinched, and you actually release more hormones that make you feel more confident.

With all of your systems working better, you will feel more confident and focused. So what are you waiting for? Try practicing deep, diaphragmatic breathing several times during the day and you’ll reap all these wonderful benefits for your body.

 

 

a - CopyBellyBreathing

Lets Rewrite our Subconcious Mind

mind hacking, The mind

After listening to and reading a tonne of books on this subject I realised that you can have all the knowledge in the world but if we don’t practice then it’s not of much use.

Daily Practice in anything is the way to programme our subconscious brain.

I learned the times table at school by constantly repeating these daily so they are stored into my computer brain.  I also learned all the words to The Fresh Prince of Bel Air over 18 years ago and wow it’s still in there along with so much more useless information.  I can drive a car without thinking about it, oh and I can ride a bike too.  So if all this information has been stored  into the computer brain then what else is in there.  There is lots of limiting beliefs and negative emotions which has been stored.

Look at your day and see what you have programmed into your day.

  1. Getting kids ready and out the door for school.  Do you programme that your going to be stressed, rushed and loose your patience and kids will have melt downs.  This was my life until I realised it didn’t have to be.  Okay so every day is not a walk in the park but when I realise I slip into panic mode about being late I take a few breaths have a word with myself and we get there, we are always early so my panicking is just using up my energy and giving my kids a horrible start to the day.  Each day I practice having more patience and my children are my greatest teachers.
  2. Eating healthy  and exercising – but eating a cake is just so much more satisfying.  Yet the guilt after it is just not worth those ten minutes of pleasure yet I do it anyway and then my negative self talk about how I never stick to anything, I shall always be fat and how everyone is better at it than me.  Spiralling negative self talk leads to low mood and energy been drained from our bodies.  So I realise that I either eat the cake, enjoy it and don’t regret it, stop the thoughts in motion.  Or I lay off the cake and feel absolutely empowered at how strong I am.  If I keep on saying no to the Cake I get stronger and stronger.  (I love a chocolate cake)  This one I am working on..
  3. My night-time sleep can be amazing when I meditate but if I miss a few days than wow its back to being rubbish.  (programme)
  4. Eating 3 meals a day (programmed from generations)
  5. Save up for your retirement then have a life (Programmes)

This list can go on and on – Write down your daily programmes by becoming aware of your thoughts and your behaviour.  It can be very interesting to see what your programming is and where it has come from.

 

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Lets Change it but How?

1. Trust your subconscious mind, recognise and become aware of your fears and habits

2.  Interview your subconscious

3. Make a promise, set the intention to work with your subconscious.

4.  Get examples – Douse your subconscious in positive case studies in the programme that you want to achieve..  Your subconscious will do anything you say is possible.

5.  Ingrain this new power into your subconscious.

Repeat, Repeat, Repeat.

Make it happen faster by putting a strong emotion behind it.

Change your physiology

Visualise again and again the new you as if you already have achieved it.

I set a reminder every hour on my phone when I have a programme that I want to pop into my subconscious goals