Buteyko Breathing

Breathing Techniques

Listening to Ben Greenfield at A fest give out some amazing hacks from ancient snd modern science about how to live life at an optimal level and one of his many many strategies is Buteyko Breathing.

So I started researching and practicing this type of breathing.

Bullet Proof Dave asprey had Buteyko therapist and author Patrick Mckeown on his podcast talking and demonstrating the techniques. It was such a fascinating podcast.

In the 1950s, Russian scientist Dr. Konstantin Buteyko identified over 150 disorders which could be resolved by normalising the breathing, and spent the next three decades developing breathiing exercises and strategies to achieve this.

The Buteyko Method of breathing re-training has now been taught over the past 20 years as a highly effective, drug-free education process which helps normalise and improve the breathing, reducing the symptoms of many common disorders. By learning the method, you can experience the medical benefits already enjoyed by thousands of people worldwide:

upto 70% less coughing, breathlessness & wheezing

reduced need for medication

improved sleep and quality of life

enhanced ability for exercise

How to do it?

A useful tool with Buteyko breathing is a simple concept called the control pause. The control pause provides feedback about your relative breathing volume. To obtain an accurate measurement, please rest for 10 minutes before measuring.

  1. Take a small, silent breath in through your nose and allow a small silent breath out through your nose.
  2. Hold your nose with your fingers to prevent air from entering your lungs.
  3. Count the number of seconds until you feel the first definite desire to breathe.
  4. At the first definite desire to breathe in, you may also feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles. Your tummy may jerk and the area around your neck may contract.
  5. Your inhalation at the end of the breath should be calm.
  6. Release your nose and breathe in through it.

Remember that taking your control pause entails holding your breath only until you feel the first involuntary movements of your breathing muscles, or the first stress of your body telling you to “breathe.” If you had to take a big breath at the end of the breath hold, then you held your breath for too long.

A very good control pause amounts to 40 seconds, and a good control pause amounts to 30 seconds. A control pause of 25 seconds indicates room for improvement, while a control pause of 15 seconds or less is indicative of symptoms such as respiratory complaints (asthma, wheezing, coughing, chest tightness or nasal problems), sleep disordered breathing (insomnia, fatigue, snoring, or obstructive sleep apnea) or anxiety complaints (excessive worrying, high stress levels, poor concentration) or any other condition resulting from chronic overbreathing. The significance of the control pause for asthma is explained in the video below.

The good news is that you will feel better each time your control pause increases by five seconds, and the first step to increase your control pause is to learn to breathe through your nose both day and night.

https://buteykoclinic.com/team_members/patrick-mckeown/

Cbd oil for menopause.

CBD for Menopause and PMT

There are cannabinoid receptors in all areas of the female reproductive organs, including both the CB1 and CB2 receptors. Given what we already know about CBD’s influence over these receptors, it’s a logical assumption to believe that CBD could help reduce the signs and symptoms of menopause through interaction in the highly concentrated areas of endocannabinoid receptors.

During menopause, women find it increasingly difficult to sleep. Hot flashes, mood swings and overall discomfort continually disrupt a healthy sleep cycle. Soon, this lack of sleep trickles down into other areas of a woman’s life and eventually increases the severity of all menopausal symptoms.

There is a growing body of research indicating that both CBD, THC and other cannabinoids are beneficial for improved sleep quality. While CBD itself may trigger a mild increase in wakefulness when taken before bed, CBD still facilitates a better and longer nights rest.

Bone Density Loss

Bone density naturally starts to decrease during menopause. In some circumstances, it can lead to future issues with osteoporosis and bone fragility. It’s common for doctors to prescribe ERT simply for the possible improvements to bone density. But, as we’ve discussed, ERT is not always a perfect long-term solution.

Cannabidiol, THCV, CBG, and CBC all are potential candidates for protecting against bone loss. In fact, these specific cannabinoids are known to stimulate bone growth. Cannabidiol, among the other cannabinoids, may represent a perfect alternative to ERT therapy for those women worried about bone density loss.

Mood Stabilizer

Alongside the inevitable hot flashes, the associated menopausal mood swings are an equally taxing part of hormonal changes. As hormones change, it changes the way women process and manage their stress levels. A woman’s body continues to operate as per usual, but with an endocannabinoid deficiency. Its suddenly not as easy to process stress, anger, and daily pressures.

Thankfully, cannabinoids are already making incredible inroads as a powerful replacement to traditional SSRI drugs. It’s a logical next step to bring the mood stabilizing capabilities of CBD, already evidenced for treating depression and anxiety, into the realm of menopausal women.

Athletes – Cbd Oil helps recovery

cbd for athletes, cbd oil, nutrition

While using cannabis as pre-workout supplement may sound crazy, it is not uncommon for elite athletes to use cannabis as a recovery tool as well. After an intense workout or training session, you may be tired, sore, or even nauseous. Many people in this situation may toss back two or three Ibuprofen, crack a beer to take the edge off and call it good. However, what you may not realize is that NSAID drugs like Ibuprofen and Aleve are extremely dangerous, especially when used with regularity. If deaths from the toxic effects of NSAID drugs were tabulated separately, these drug toxicities would constitute the 15th most common cause of death in the United States. Therefore, we suggest athletes stick to a more powerful, less toxic, and naturally occurring substance like cannabis. In this guide, we will help you understand the benefits of cannabis as a recovery tool and how to garner these benefits in your own post-workout regimen.

 

Nutrition helps post-workout recovery

Protein

In order to produce our own proteins, we must consume proteins. Protein supplementation, both pre- and post-workout, generally improves recovery, muscle growth and strength2. However, specific amounts and types of protein can promote greater improvements in physical fitness. For example, drinking milk after a workout can promote increases in muscle size and strength while decreasing body fat. To be more specific, the amino acid known as leucine, particularly a dose of 3-4 grams, can promote maximum muscle gain. However, fast-acting carbohydrates such as glucose are needed because the release of insulin that follows carbohydrate intake promotes tissue growth.

Carbs

Carbohydrate intake after intense exercise3 is also essential in order to replenish stores of energy that may have been exhausted, preferably within one hour after finishing. Of course, rehydration should never be overlooked after intense exercise. This includes both water and electrolytes such as sodium, which reduce urine losses and are needed for cellular functions, but are lost in significant amounts through sweat. Approximately 25-50% more water than what has been lost through sweat is required for proper rehydration, and this should be taken within 4-6
hours after exercise.

Post-Workout Recovery Tips using Hemp & Cannabidiol

But where can hemp and cannabinoids play a role in post-exercise recovery?  Some cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and painkilling (analgesic) effects. This is relevant because strenuous exercise increases oxidative stress4 and therefore inflammation, while moderate antioxidant supplementation may reduce the damage.  In pre-clinical research, CBD was found to be a stronger antioxidant than vitamin C or E5, able to protect cells against damage caused by reactive oxygen molecules. However, isolated CBD has been found to only exert anti-inflammatory and painkilling effects in a limited dose range6.

In fact, another cannabinoid known as cannabigerol7 (CBG) has been shown to reduce inflammatory markers and increase levels of one of the body’s own antioxidants, superoxide dismutase.

Besides the cannabinoids, terpenoids8 present in hemp extracts also possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic abilities. Additionally, the terpenoid myrcene is recognised as a sleep aid and may be a muscle relaxant, which could help athletes rest after intensive exercise. Alpha-pinene has been found to help dilate (widen) airways, which may increase oxygen supply and therefore aid clearance of lactic acid and tissue repair. However, while whole hemp extracts look like a promising aid to post-exercise recovery, they should be used alongside standard recommendations of rest, rehydration and nutrition.


References

  1. Tortora, GJ & Derrickson, B, 2012, Principles of Anatomy & Physiology, 13th edn, Wiley
  2. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1550-2783-9-54/fulltext.html
  3. http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/competition_and_training/recovery_nutrition
  4. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Antoni_Aguilo/publication/5293501_Influence_of_an_Antioxidant_Vitamin-Enriched_Drink_on_Pre-_and_Post-Exercise_Lymphocyte_Antioxidant_System/links/0deec5320e4793680a000000.pdf
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC20965/
  6. http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=53912
  7. http://www.medicinalgenomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/CBG_Colitis.pdf
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3165946/