Clearing energies

Detoxing the energy of your mind, body, and spirit can do much more than clear a few heavy vibes. It can change the way you see your day, your life, your experiences, and your relationships. But what exactly is an energetic detox?

Recieving regular reiki whether by a practitioner or from yourself can do wonders for your energy levels

Some days, you may not even realize that your energy was heavy or you felt off until the day is almost over. That’s OK. The more you practice these body scans and detoxes, the easier it will become to cleanse your mental, physical, and spiritual energy.

Clearing mental space

Before you start your day, take a few moments to connect to your mental, emotional energy, noticing what comes up. These tools can help you do it:

1. Essential oils

I always recommend smelling a few drops of orange or peppermint essential oil to cleanse and open the mind first thing in the morning or during the midday slump. This can help clear any dusty energy left over from a poor night’s sleep or the grogginess that sets in halfway through the day.

2. Energetic movements

If you already have a yoga or fitness regimen, that’s great. Another way to move energy during the day is by simply making some arm circles or doing a few lunges to get the blood circulating.

3. EFT

For those of you who haven’t tried emotional freedom technique (aka tapping/EFT), give it a try and see if it helps soothe the mind’s anxieties, worry, fears, and overall negative, unhelpful vibes. Tapping has been known to help relief stress, anxiety, and bring clarity to the mind.

Clearing physical space

How do you feel when you walk through the front door of your home? Are you energized, light, and open? Or heavy, cluttered, and depleted? If it’s the latter, it might be time to give some of these tools a try:

1. Sage smudge sticks

Light some sage or palo santo and carry it around your space with the intention of dissolving any negative, unserving, or heavy vibrations. Once you’ve done a walk-through, thank the space for its guidance and set a prayer for what you want to call into it. Then, burn some incense to help lift and energize the space with your prayer.

2. Decluttering

If it’s been a while since you’ve gone through your desk, office, closet, or shed, take a few hours and get decluttering. By letting things go in your home, you’ll release stagnant energy in the body as well.

3. Crystals

If you have the ability to spend a little money (or a lot, depending on your stone!), consider place crystals around your home, bedroom, office, and car to keep their energies protected, cleansed, and uplifted. I recommend amethyst near the bed for dreams, rose or crystal quartz inside the bedroom for love, and tiger’s-eye and black tourmaline on the desk to bring clarity of thought.

Clearing spiritual space

Remembering the triad of mind, body, and spirit can help you move the negative space in your life and start attracting all that you desire and intend. Here are a few techniques for cleansing your spiritual clutter:

1. Disconnecting

Let’s say you’ve just completed a task or project, finished an intense meeting with someone, or had an interaction that lingers. Now, it’s time to close the energetic connection. Lift your arms up like you’re going to make a big circle, then cross them in front of the chest making an X. This energetic technique closes the energy between two connected beings or things.

2. Breath detox

If you are feeling tired, sore, depleted, or heavy in the morning or at night, place your hands on your heart and send some love and light into your body through a round of five deep inhales and exhales. Fill your essence and energy up by simply being with yourself and your breath. I find doing ten minutes of slow deep breathing to be very energising

3. Morning ritual

Setting an intention for yourself for the day. This helps clear my mindset, focus my energy, and bust through lingering negativity.

Helping kids to care

5 WAYS TO HELP CHILDREN CARE MORE ABOUT OTHERS

Below are five ideas for helping children expand their “Circles of Concern” so they are more aware of and begin to build empathy for many different kinds of people. These days, it can feel like caring is in a downward spiral—especially when it comes to our ability to care for those who are outside of our immediate circles of friends and family and those who look, worship, or vote differently than we do. Indeed, Making Caring Common research suggests that caring hasn’t been a priority for young people or their parents when compared to personal happiness or achievement.

In our 2013 survey of 10,000 youth, 80% told us that achievement or happiness is their top priority, while only 20% identified their top priority as caring for others. Youth we surveyed were even more likely to say that their peers valued achievement and happiness over caring, and they were three times more likely to agree than disagree with this statement:

“My parents are prouder if I get good grades than if I’m a caring community member.” One of the key strategies that we developed to help parents and educators combat this trend is our“Circle of Concern” exercise.

Circle of Concern acknowledges that, while empathy for those in our immediate “circles” of family and friends tends to come naturally, developing empathy for people outside those circles must often be more intentional. Because these exercises are intended to help build children’s empathy “muscles,” commit to them for at least six to twelve months.

1 Hit the library. Create a reading list of books in which the main character is different from your child in a significant way, and read and discuss at least one book each month (Common Sense Mediaand your local librarian are excellent resources for compiling an age-appropriate reading list). How is the book’s main character different from your child? How are they the same? What is one question your child would ask the character if he or she had the chance? Would your child want to be friends with the main character? Why or why not?Map it out.

2. Help your child learn about new countries and cultures by hanging a world map in his or her room or in a common space in your home. Spend some time each week researching and discussing the culture of that country (the Smithsonian’s online encyclopediaand the CIA’s World Factbook offer free online resources for this). Together with your child, develop five questions about each country you choose. For example, how do people greet each other? How do they say goodbye? What foods do people eat? What holidays do they celebrate? Older children might be interested in the types of government in different countries and their human rights records (Amnesty International can be a good source for this information).

.3. Have a friendly competition. Who can say “hi” to the most new people in a week, you or your child? If it’s age-appropriate, keep a log of everyone you and your child greet in a notebook or on your phone (extra points for a selfie with new friends!). The winner gets to choose a special dinner or dessert at the end of the contest. Raise the stakes. Ready for more?

4. Encourage your child to invite someone new to sit with her or him at lunchtime, invite a new friend over, and/or lend a hand to someone at school who isn’t a close friend. You’re not off the hook! Do the same at your workplace or in your neighborhood. Discuss the experience with your child afterwards. What did you both learn?5. Practice makes perfect. How can you and your child contribute to others in your own community? Whether it’s shoveling a neighbor’s driveway when it snows or taking a neighbor’s trash to the curb, organizing a park clean-up every few months, or bringing canned goods to a food pantry each month, discuss and choose a regular activity with your child that brings you both in touch with those who are in need in your community. Interested in more research and strategies for raising kind kids? Visit us atwww.makingcaringcommon.org and follow us onFacebook and Twitter. This post was written by Alison Cashin, Director and Luba Falk Feigenberg, Research Director

Note To Self – Always Be A Kid

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You can be a child by enjoying small things and being happy with almost anything.Don’t mistake “being a kid at heart” for immaturity. As adults, we learn to become more mature and responsible individuals. Ironically, I believe one of the biggest signs of maturity is choosing to be a kid at heart.Part of me melts every time I encounter children because I observe their carefree, happy, innocent nature, from which adults could stand to learn.

Here are 11 reasons why you are a kid at heart:

1. You always smile.I absolutely adore when a kid smiles at me. It’s highly contagious and impossible for me not to smile back. Children smile because they are truly happy, as their lives are not complicated or filled with much responsibility.They find joy and pure happiness in the simplest things, and they share those giggles with everyone. Charlie Chapman said it best: “A day without laughter is a day wasted.”

 

2. You forgive freely and know every day is a fresh start.Have you ever noticed that children have the uncanny ability to see every day as a new beginning? They forget about the past easily and don’t hold grudges.When two children fight, they are upset for that time period, but then, the very next day, they are best friends again. As we grow into adults, this becomes tougher and we find it difficult to forgive and let things go.It’s never too late to forgive and start all over.

3. You believe and dream big.In a child’s world, nothing is impossible. The ability of children to believe sparks faith and optimism to never give up. Many adults lose this ability because we tend to see things for how they were or are, rather than how they could be.If we made an effort and believed in pursuing our dreams, we would be more likely to achieve them, even if those dreams seem nearly impossible to accomplish

 

.4. You are carefree and fearless.Children have the most amazing ability to be carefree and fearless. They are limitless and have no boundaries because they are not yet confined by the fear of shame or failure; they do things because they just don’t know any better.As we grow into adults, we tend to worry or fear the unknown and what others may think of us.Embrace what life has to offer in a carefree and fearless manner so you can be unstoppable

 

.5. You are active.I remember when I was a little kid, I played hopscotch, jump-roped to “Cinderella, dressed in yellow, went upstairs to kiss her fellow,” ran around the grass with the sprinklers on, had mud fights and did cartwheels for days. I found joy in doing these everyday activities without even thinking of them as forms of exercise.To be honest, I still do some of these things and for the same damn reason — it’s fun.6. You take pleasure in little things.When I was a kid, I would get so excited every Sunday when the ice cream truck made its way around our neighborhood. But, it wasn’t the ice cream I was enthusiastic about; it was more so the song that made me giddytime I heard the truck’s tune, I ran to my dad, asked him to open up the garage, sprinted outside and busted out crazy dance moves to my jam.My dad would then proceed to buy me my favorite rainbow popsicle, which I found fascinating because my tongue turned different colors after licking it.Those simple things made me so happy. As we grow into adults, we take things for granted and stop taking pleasure in the little things. Why do we stop noticing the simple things that have the potential to bring us joy?

7. You love unconditionally.The best thing about children is their love. They could care less about your flaws; they don’t care what you look like, who you are, where you are from or what you do because their love is limitless.It’s true what Mahatma Gandhi stated:The law of love could be best understood and learned through little children.

 

8. You use your creativity and imagination.I remember losing myself in creative activities as a child. I drew pictures for hours, played with clay, built spaceships and rockets out of LEGOs, pretended I was on the “Lizzie McGuire” show, and then bust out, “Hi, my name is Sheena from ‘Lizzie McGuire’ and you’re watching Disney Channel!”For some reason, as we get older, we get busier. We stop seeing these creative activities as meaningful and worthwhile. The truth is, creativity is the reason our world is so advanced. One should never lose his or her imagination.

 

9. You have endless curiosity.As a kid, I remember continuously asking my parents questions: Where did we come from? Why do people die? Where is God? What does this mean? I was curious but clueless.Children know they don’t know everything, so they ask a million and one questions to gain knowledge and understanding. Answer this: Isn’t asking questions better than not asking any questions at all?

 

10. You ask for help.I remember when two boys bullied me in second grade. Call it tattletaling if you must, but for me, it was simply asking for help. Children always ask for help because they don’t know what they are doing or how to handle certain situations.As we grow into adults, we sometimes look at asking for help as weakness. Always feel empowered to ask for help, whether it be on how to do something or how to get through something. We aren’t alone; we all need help every now and then.

 

11. If you fall, you get back up and run.When a child takes a tumble, he or she might need to be comforted for a bit, but then, the child quickly recovers and runs off to play.As adults, we may be hurt, but as long as we pick ourselves back up and move on, the bruises begin to finally heal.Subscribe to Elite Daily’s official newsletter,

From the wonderful —

The Edge, for more stories you don’t want to miss. 475 Shares Sheena Amin Contributor Sheena is a contributing writer based in Irvine, California. She graduated from University of California Irvine in 2013 with a degree in Public Health.