Parkinsons and CBD Oils

CBD for Parkinsons

 

Patients turn to cannabis

It’s little wonder then that Parkinson’s sufferers and their families, desperate to slow down the course of the disease and ameliorate the life limiting symptoms, look towards other options. And while, to some, cannabis might seem like a medical wildcard, its use for the disease can be traced back to the 19th Century, where it was described in William Richard Gowers’s “Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System.”

Back then, very little was known about the chemical compounds in the plant.

Indeed, it’s only in the last twenty years that scientists have really begun to understand how cannabis affects the body with the discovery of the endocannabinoid system – the homeostatic regulator comprising a network of receptors (CB1 and CB2) and cannabis-like chemicals, found predominantly in the brain, central nervous and immune system.

The area of the brain affected by Parkinson’s, the basal ganglia, has a high density of CB1 receptors and in experimental Parkinson’s models scientists have observed increased CB1 activity in this brain region. Greater CB2 receptor expression has also been noted in the brain’s glial cells, as well as an overall increase in endocannabinoid production.

Researchers have already seen that botanical cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant can have a direct impact on the endocannabinoid system. It’s no surprise then that an exciting area of research into combating neurodegenerative disease is the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic tools.

 

Key to your decision should be finding CBD oils that are extracted from organic hemp, using state-of-the-art Supercritical CO2 methods. This ensures you that the CBD oil is both free from solvents and that the active compounds like cannabinoids and terpenes are preserved.

Effects of cannabidiol in the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease: an exploratory double-blind trial.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237116

Box Breathing – If its good enough for Navy Seals…

Breathing Techniques

Navy Seals train hard and not just on their bodies but on their minds too.  They have to be able to stay calm in the most frightening of situations.  What if we could learn to do it to so that we can better handle our emotions and our busy over active minds.

Well with practice we can and it is all down to our breathing.  When we are frightened or angry our breathing naturally becomes more rapid and shallow which causes fight or flight response and the more we do this the more we are likely to develop chronic illnesses brought on by this stress response.

Here is how Box Breathing or four square Breathing works

 

Before you get started, make sure that you’re seated upright in a comfortable chair with your feet flat on the floor. Try to be an a stress-free, quiet environment where you can focus on your breathing. Keeping your hands relaxed in your lap with your palms facing up, focus on your posture. You should be sitting up straight. This will help you take deep breaths.

When you’re ready, start with step 1.

Step 1

Sitting upright, slowly exhale, getting all the oxygen out of your lungs. Focus on this intention and be conscious of what you’re doing.

Step 2

Inhale slowly and deeply through your nose to the count of four. In this step, count to four very slowly in your head. Feel the air fill your lungs, one section at a time, until your lungs are completely full and the air moves into your abdomen.

Step 3

Hold your breath for another slow count of four.

Step 4

Exhale through your mouth for the same slow count of four, expelling the air from your lungs and abdomen. Be conscious of the feeling of the air leaving your lungs.

Step 5

Hold your breath for the same slow count of four before repeating this process.

 

Practice anywhere and throughout the day as often as you like or just before you know you are going to feel nervous and this will help to calm you down.

 

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