Research Studies into Reflexology

Reflexology

Impact of Reflexology on the Workplace Danish Study 1 A reflexologist was hired by a Scandinavian airline’s cargo department to improve staff morale and reduce sick leave for its 60 employees, resulting in monthly savings of US$3,300. This is what their employees said:

“Our work is done through computers and people spending many hours in a chair doing their work, resulting in aching shoulders and back. Since we employed our reflexologist we have experienced a substantial decrease of people being ill and away from work. It has had a physical and psychological effect. There is a much better atmosphere in the department, because the employees feel there is something being done about their problems. Before staff used to stay at home, now we see them go to work anyway because they know they can get a treatment and feel better.” (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Danish Study 2 The Odense Postal District employed a reflexologist for 3 years to deal with employee stress. Two hundred and thirty five employees participated resulting in a 25% fall in sick leave, saving £110,000 and 170 employees reported a good impact on their health. (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Danish Study 3 A reflexologist was employed for 6 months. 52 employees (all women) were treated for various ailments. Sick leave fell by 65.9% 97.5% had a positive effect on their primary problem 77.5% had a positive effect on their secondary problem They had a 27.5% reduction in medication. (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Headaches and Migraines
The National Board of Health Study, Denmark This widescale study was commissioned in Denmark since there were 729,000 lost workdays in 1994 from migraines. The results showed that 19% of headache sufferers stopped taking medication following reflexology work. They found that reflexology treatments had a beneficial effect on patients suffering from migraine and tension headaches.

The study was conducted at the Department of Social Pharmacy, The Royal Danish School of Pharmacy in co-operation with 5 reflexology associations. 220 patients participated. The majority had moderate to severe symptoms: 90% had taken prescribed medication for their headaches one month prior to the study (81% was acetvlsalicyclic acid and paracetamol taken twice a week, with 72% of stronger medication taken fortnightly); with 36% experiencing side effects from the medicines. 34% had taken medication for other non-headache ailments.

3 months after completing the reflexology treatments, the results were:

16% had been cured 65% had reduced symptoms 19% reported that they had been able to stop all medication taken before the study. Those participants who continued with reflexology sessions after the six-month period reported the greatest probability for cure. Those who had headaches for the shortest period prior to the study reported the greatest relief after the study. One thing the researchers noticed that may have affected the study was that once receiving reflexology, many of the participants seemed to make lifestyle changes that reflected how they looked at their headaches. Prior to receiving reflexology, patients looked at their headaches as something separate from themselves over which they had no control. After working with a reflexologist, they seemed to understand the mind-body connection to their headache and how it could be controlled through the integration of the mind and body. It appeared that the reflexology practitioner became a catalyst for initiating the learning process and inspiring personal development in the patient. (Brendstrup, Eva and Launs‾, Laila, “Headache and Reflexological Treatment,” The Council Concerning Alternative Treatment, The National Board of Health, Denmark, 1997)

 
Reflexology was found to be as effective in the treatment of headaches as medication (flunarizine), without its side-effects. It was concluded that the reflexology treatment may be classified as an alternative non-pharmacological therapeutic treatment that would be particularly appropriate to those patients that were unable to follow pharmacological treatment. (Lafuente A et al (1990). Effekt der Reflex zonenbehandlung am FuB bezuglich der prophylaktischen Behandlung mit Flunarizin bei an Cephalea-Kopfschmerzen leidenden Patieten.Erfahrungsheilkunde. 39, 713-715.)

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Chinese Study A Chinese study of 26 patients, 9 men and 17 women, from 19 to 43 years of age showed that after one session of foot reflexology, 13 of the participants considered themselves symptom free, and 1 reported symptoms relieved. After two sessions, 6 considered themselves to be cured and 1 reported to be symptom free. After three sessions, 2 participants said they were cured and 3 stated their symptoms were unchanged. The conclusion of this study was that reflexology is a safe, economic therapy.
Gynaecological Problems • Pre-menstrual syndrome • Various gynaecological disorders • Menopausal Symptoms • Amenorrhea • Male Impotence • Dymenstruation/(painful periods) • Hypermenorrhea/(excessive uterine bleeding)

Diabetes
Chinese Study 1 32 cases of type II diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into 2 groups. One group was treated with conventional Western Medicine hypoglycemic agent and reflexology, the other group with the same medicine only (WM).

After daily treatments over 30 days, fasting blood glucose levels, platelet aggregation, length and wet weight of the thrombus, senility symptom scores and serum lipid peroxide (LPO) were greatly reduced in the reflexology group (P,0.05-0.01), while no significant change was observed in the WM group.

The study suggested that reflexology was an effective treatment for type II diabetes mellitis. (Wang, X. M., “Type II diabetes mellitus with foot reflexotherapy,” Chuang Koh Chuang Hsi I Chief Ho Teas Chi, Beijing , Vol. 13, Sept. 1993, pp 536-538)

Chinese Study 2 22 cases with non-insulin dependent diabetes were split into 2 groups. The patients of both groups had taken hypoglycemic agents for a long time. Reflexology was provided daily for 30 days. Results: The indexes of the scores of senility, thrombocyte aggregation rates (TAR), the length and wet weights of thrombosis in vitro, and the serum oxidative lipids were measured to judge curative effect.

The results were so positive that the researchers recommend that further research using larger numbers of patients in controlled clinical trials into the effectiveness of reflexology in alleviating pain, nausea and anxiety in the management of these symptoms by the family at home is warranted. (Foot Massage: A nursing intervention to modify the distressing symptoms of pain and nausea in patients hospitalized with cancer,” Grealish, L. Lomasney, A., Whiteman, B., Cancer Nurse 2000, June;23(3):237-43 (On-line review: “Reflexology Used for Cancer Patients,” Internet Health Library, October 11, 2000)

Cancer (Quality of life) Results: 100% of the reflexology group benefited from an improvement in quality of life: appearance, appetite, breathing, communication (doctors), communication (family), communication (nurses), concentration, constipation, diarrhoea, fear of future, isolation, micturition, mobility, mood, nausea, pain, sleep and tiredness. An improvement in all components of the quality of life scale was reported in the reflexology group compared to 67. 5 in the placebo group. This study suggests that the provision of reflexology for palliative patients within the general setting could be beneficial. Not only did the patients in this study enjoy the intervention, they were also ‘relaxed,’ comforted’ and achieved relief from some of their symptoms. (Hodgson, H. “Does reflexology impact on cancer patients’ quality of life?,” Nursing Standard, 14, 31, p. 33-38)

Cancer (Anxiety and pain) Results: Foot reflexology alleviated anxiety and pain for 23 patients with breast and lung cancer. Researchers noted a significant decrease in anxiety for patients diagnosed with breast or lung cancer and a significant decrease in pain for patients with breast cancer. “This has important implications for nursing practice as both professionals and lay people can be taught reflexology. Reflexology is a simple technique for human touch which can be performed anywhere, requires no special equipment, is non-invasive and does not interfere with patients’ privacy.” (Stephenson, N. L., Weinrich, S. P. and Tavakoli, A. S., “The effects of foot reflexology on anxiety and pain in patients with breast and lung cancer,” OncolNursForum 2000, Jan.-Feb.;27(1):67-72)

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Dr Axe Talks about CBD Oil (proven benefits)

cbd oil

 

                                                                    8 Proven Benefits of CBD
1. Relieves Pain and Inflammation
Among common CBD benefits, natural pain relief tops the list for many. Evidence suggests that cannabinoids may prove useful in pain modulation by inhibiting neuronal transmission in pain pathways. A 2012 study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine found that CBD significantly suppressed chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rodents without causing analgesic tolerance. Researchers suggest that CBD and other non psychoactive components of marijuana may represent a novel class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic pain.
According to a 2007 meta-analysis conducted in Canada, the combination of CBD and THC buccal spray was found to be effective in treating neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, which can be debilitating for 50 to 70 percent of MS patients
2. Has Antipsychotic Effects
Research shows that CBD benefits include producing antipsychotic effects. It appears to have a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs as seen using behavioural and neurochemical techniques in animal studies. Additionally, studies show that CBD prevents human experimental psychosis and is effective in open case reports and clinical trials in patients with schizophrenia, with a remarkable safety profile.
3. Reduces Anxiety
Studies using animal models of anxiety and involving healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. Cannabidiol has shown to reduce anxiety in patients with social anxiety disorder and researchers suggest that it may also be effective for panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.
A 2011 study aimed to compare the effects of a simulation public speaking test on healthy control patients and treatment-native patients with social anxiety disorder. A total of 24 never-treated patients with social anxiety disorder were given either CBD or placebo 1.5 hours before the test. Researchers found that pre treatment with CBD significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort in their speech performance, and significantly decreased alertness in anticipation of their speech. The placebo group presented higher anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort.
4. Helps to Fight Cancer
Several scientific reports demonstrate that CBD benefits include possessing antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic effects that inhibit cancer cell migration, adhesion and invasion. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics found for the first time that CBD potently and selectively inhibited the growth of different breast tumor cell lines and exhibited significantly less potency in non-cancer cells.
In 2011, researchers added light on the cellular mechanism through which CBD induces cell death in breast cancer cells. They showed that CBD induced a concentration-dependent cell death of both oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells. They also found that the effective concentrations of CBD in tumor cells have little effect on non-tumorigenic, mammary cells.
CBD behaves as a non-toxic compound and studies show that doses of 700 milligrams per day for 6 weeks did not show any overt toxicity in humans, suggesting that it can be used for prolonged treatment. Not only does the research show that CBD benefits including being effective in fighting breast cancer cells, data also suggests that it can be used to inhibit the invasion of lung and colon cancer, plus it possesses anti-tumor properties in gliomas and has been used to treat leukaemia.

5. Relieves Nausea
Cannabis has been used for centuries for the suppression of nausea and vomiting. Research has revealed that among more than 80 cannabinoid compounds found in marijuana, both the intoxicant THC and the non-intoxicant CBD helps to get rid of nausea and vomiting in animal studies. A 2012 study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found that CBD benefits including possessing anti-nausea and antiemetic effects when it was administered to rats. Researchers found that CBD acts in a diphasic manner, meaning that in low doses it suppresses toxin-induced vomiting, but in high doses it increases nausea or has no effect.
6. May Treat Seizures and Other Neurological Disorders
A 2014 survey conducted by researchers at Stanford University was presented to parents belonging to a Facebook group dedicated to sharing information about the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis to treat their child’s seizures. Nineteen responses met the inclusion criteria for the study: a diagnosis of epilepsy and current use of CBD-enriched cannabis. The average number of anti-epileptic drugs tried before using CBD cannabis was 12. Sixteen (84 percent) of the 19 parents reported a reduction in their child’s seizure frequency while taking CBD cannabis. Of these, two (11 percent) reported complete seizure freedom, eight (42 percent) reported a greater than 80 percent reduction in seizure frequency, and six (32 percent) reported a 25–60 percent seizure reduction. Other beneficial effects included increased alertness, better mood and improved sleep; while side effects included drowsiness and fatigue.
Later in 2014, researchers reported on preliminary results of a study involving children with treatment-resistant epilepsies in an expanded access “compassionate use program.” Patients received a purified 98 percent oil-based CBD extract called Epidiolex, which is made by GW Pharmaceuticals. After 3 months of treatment, 39 percent of the 23 patients had more than a 50 percent reduction in seizures, with a 32 percent median reduction. These preliminary results support the animal studies and survey reports that CBD may be a promising treatment for treatment-resistant epilepsy and it is generally well-tolerated in doses up to 25 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.
7. Lowers Incidence of Diabetes
A 2006 study found that CBD treatment significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice from an incidence of 86 percent in non-treated mice to an incidence of 30 percent in CBD-treated mice. CBD benefits also showed a significant reduction of plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. A histological examination of the pancreatic islets of the CBD-treated mice revealed significantly reduced insulitis.
In 2013, the American Journal of Medicine published a study that highlighted the impact of marijuana use on glucose, insulin and insulin resistance among U.S. adults. The study included 4,657 adult men and women from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey from 2005 to 2010. Of the participants, 579 were current marijuana users and 1,975 were past users. The researchers found that current marijuana use was associated with 16 percent lower fasting insulin levels. They also found significant associations between marijuana use and smaller waist circumferences, a factor connected to the onset of diabetes symptoms.
8. Promotes Cardiovascular Health
A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology reports that CBD protects against the vascular damage caused by a high glucose environment, inflammation or the induction of type 2 diabetes in animal models; plus, CBD proved to reduce the vascular hyperpermeability (which causes leaky gut) associated with such environments.