cbd oil

Patent No. 6630507, held by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, covers the use of cannabinoids for treating a wide range of diseases.

Under U.S. federal law, marijuana is defined as having no medical use. So it might come as a surprise to hear that the government owns one of the only patents on marijuana as a medicine.

The patent (US6630507) is titled “Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants” and was awarded to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in October 2003.

It was filed four years earlier, in 1999, by a group of scientists from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

The government’s patent does not cover THC, the main ingredient in marijuana. On the other hand, cannabidiol (CBD) is specifically mentioned as an example of a cannabinoid that is covered. The patent describes CBD and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids as superior when taken in higher doses.

“Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses.”

According to the description, CBD can be ingested in very large amounts without side effects.

“No signs of toxicity or serious side effects have been observed following chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers, even in large acute doses of 700mg/day.”

The patent explains that cannabidiol previously had not been considered useful as a neuroprotectant. However, it cites various studies on cannabidiol as an antiepileptic and as a potential treatment for glaucoma.

Other great reads on the Cannabis Conspiracy

https://www.denverpost.com/2016/08/28/what-is-marijuana-patent-6630507/

https://www.bing.com/search?q=truth+is+goverments+have+owned+patent+cbd+oil+for+years&form=EDGEAR&qs=PF&cvid=0f8f429236894cada918eea8e5390bc5&cc=GB&setlang=en-US&PC=LCTS

1992 discovery of the EndoCannabinoid System

The Endocannabinoid System

0By Julia Granowiz

Have you ever wondered why marijuana affects us the way it does? What is it that makes THC and CBD react with our bodies, healing and offering relief to the ill? What makes this plant such a diverse medicine, able to treat such a large number of vastly different conditions?

If you had asked this question fifty years ago, there wouldn’t have been an answer for you to find. Unfortunately, the extraction methods available in the early 1900s made it difficult to determine which one of the 80+ cannabinoids found in cannabis was the psychoactive cannabinoid responsible for the effects of marijuana.

The truth is, it’s only been in the last couple of decades that scientists have truly even begun to understand the ways cannabis works within our bodies.

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In 1988, the first cannabinoid receptor was found in the brain of a rat. Initially found by Allyn Howlett and William Devane these cannabinoid receptors turned out to be plentiful in the brain – more so than any other neurotransmitter receptor.
Soon after this discovery researchers started using a synthetic form of THC (which is actually FDA approved these days, to treat severe nausea and wasting syndrome) to start mapping the CB receptors in the brain. Not much of a surprise, the receptors were located primarily found in the regions responsible for mental and physiological processes including memory, higher cognition, motor coordination, appetite and emotions among other places.
This would only begin to explain how cannabinoids affect our brains and bodies – already however, it was becoming clear that cannabinoids likely played a larger part in our physiology than we ever expected. After all, why would we have cannabinoid receptors if cannabinoids could only be delivered from external sources?
It wasn’t until two years later in 1990 before the next big breakthrough; when Lisa Matsuda announced at the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine that she and her colleagues at the National Institute of Mental Health had managed to pinpoint the DNA sequence that defines a THC-sensitive receptor in a rat’s brain.
Not long after this announcement they were able to successfully clone that receptor – allowing them to create molecules that “fit” or “activate” the receptors. Scientists were also able to develop genetically altered mice that lacked this specific receptor – meaning THC should have no effect on them.

When THC was given to the “knockout mice” as they were called, they found that because the THC had nowhere to bind, there was no way to trigger any psychoactive activity – proving once and for all that THC works by activating specific cannabinoid receptors in the brain and central nervous system.

Soon after, in 1993, a second cannabinoid receptor was found – as a part of the immune and nervous systems. Dubbed CB2 (the CB receptors in the brain officially dubbed CB1 receptors) receptors they are found to be plentiful throughout the gut, spleen, liver, heart kidneys, bones, blood vessels, lymph cells and even the reproductive organs.

However that curious, pesky question remained unanswered – why do we have cannabinoid receptors in the first place?

The answer to that question started to unfold in 1992, when the first endocannabinoid was discovered. Anandamide was the first, naturally occurring endogenous cannabinoid, or endocannabinoid. It was found by Raphael Mechoulam as well as NIMH researchers William Devane and Dr. Lumir Hanus.

This is still only one of two known and relatively well-understood endocannabinoids. It attaches to the same CB receptors as THC and it was named after the Sanskrit word for bliss.

A second endocannabinoid was identified in 1995, discovered by none other than Mechoulam’s group yet again. This second major endocannabinoid was dubbed 2-arachidonoylglycerol or “2-AG” to keep it simple. This particular endocannabinoid attaches to both CB1 and CB2 receptors.

It was these discoveries, working backwards, tracing the metabolic pathways of THC, which allowed scientists to discover an entirely unknown molecular signaling system that resides within us – and within thousands of other biological lifeforms, basically everything on our planet with the exception of insects.

Due to the role cannabis played in discovering this system it was rightfully named the endocannabinoid system. While we knew about the plant first – this cellular process has been happening within us for millions of years. According to Dr. John McPartland, the system started evolving as long ago as 600 million years back – when complex life meant a sponge.

There is evidence that a possible third CB receptor has still gone unidentified, thirteen years after the CB2 receptor was initially discovered.

Since then, we have found out that the endocannabinoid system is responsible for maintaining many of our normal bodily functions – everything from helping to maintain healthy bone density (as found in a study with mice and the previously mentioned “knockout mice”) to naturally preventing diabetes – and that’s only the beginning.

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It’s interesting to see how far we’ve come – fifty years ago THC had just been identified – now, thanks to the discovery of that one cannabinoid we’ve discovered an entire molecular system within our bodies that we never knew about.

Actually, the endocannabinoid system is possibly the single-most important system within our entire bodies – responsible for maintaining homeostasis. Basically, if our endocannabinoid system is out-of-whack, your whole body could be at risk as it is responsible for many of our normal day to day functions.

Is it so hard to think that if supplementing unbalanced naturally occurring endocannabinoids with the cannabinoids from cannabis is able to manage, relieve or control a condition (such as ALS, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s) and even cure cancer – that it might be possible to use the same process to prevent such conditions in the first place?
“I now believe the answer is yes. Research has shown that small doses of cannabinoids from cannabis can signal the body to make more endocannabinoids and build more cannabinoid receptors. This is why many first-time cannabis users don’t feel an effect, but by their second or third time using the herb they have built more cannabinoid receptors and are ready to respond. More receptors increase a person’s sensitivity to cannabinoids; smaller doses have larger effects, and the individual has an enhanced baseline of endocannabinoid activity. I believe that small, regular doses of cannabis might act as a tonic to our most central physiologic healing system.” – Dustin Sulak, DO (Taken from a blog post from NORML.org)

What is cbd Oil

cbd oil

CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is just one of over 85 cannabinoids that is identified in the cannabis plant. CBD is becoming increasingly popular amongst the masses for having a wide scope of medicinal benefits – due to clinical reports and mounds of test data showing little to no side effects and a lack of psychoactivity (typically associated with marijuana products and high THC).

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Cannabidiol (CBD) is not only a major phytocannabinoid, it is the most concentrated form from the three main cannabis plants. The three main forms to use cannabis are Hashish, Resin, & Oil.

Phytocannabinoids

With our HempWorx line, our products utilize a Full Spectrum CBD formulated with Hemp Seed Oil. For the first time in 1964, CBD isolation was reported and it was the beginning of cannabinoid synthesisation. Originally, this synthesis started on CBG, but since CBG is present in most of the Cannabis types in small amounts, the majority of the research was concentrated on THC and CBD. Besides the Cannabinoids that are naturally occurring in nature, pharmaceutical companies have synthesized cannabinoid compounds in order to market leading drugs in the pharmaceutical market. Some of these chemically modified drugs do not have psychoactive effects, but retain some of the health benefits from the cannabinoid properties. However, some of these synthetic drugs can have a life-threatening adverse effect, or cause other issues in the human body. Phytocannabinoids, on the other hand, have been used for many years, and no life-threatening side effects have ever been reported. Find out more

Phytocannabinoids, on the other hand, have been used for many years, and no life-threatening side effects have ever been reported. Find out more

How does CBD work in the human body?

CBD or cannabidiol is the main active compound in hemp, and unlike THC, it is not psychoactive, so it doesn’t make people high. As you know, inside the human body there’s the endocannabinoid system, with receptors spread throughout the brain and body.

find out more at CBD Oil and much more

Order Now to start on your journey to better health order these amazing products. You can choose between the 500 or 750 depending on your on health goals.

Reiki distance to large numbers

reiki

I decided to start sending free reiki via Facebook to anyone who got in touch who needed it. I wasn’t sure at first how to send Reiki to more than one person at a time but I soon figured it out.

I think I had about 20 people for my first one, I wrote all names down had a peak at profile pics and started. I set up my room so it was nice and relaxing. I also advised everyone of my start and finish times and advised them of what they may want to do before and during the healing.

As long as you remain open to the healing you are being sent I find it flows much better. I personally feel a great deal doing distance healing, the energy in my hands is quite intense at times and the flow of energy I feel is just lovely and relaxing

More Distance Healing Tips

Connect with the people needing healing and their surrounding areas, to whomever or wherever your awareness is attracted.

  • Connect with your own spirituality (whatever that may be).
  • You can use an object to help focus your energy if you choose; besides the cupped hands, you can use a pillow, blanked, or some other physical object.
  • Experiment with using distant healing when watching the news. Allow the loving energy to flow into the news that you are witnessing as you exhale.
  • Remember to breathe and feel the energy moving through your body.
  • Combine different techniques.
  • Allow your love to grow stronger each time you practice distant healing.
  • Take action on the inspirations you receive while doing distant healing.

I use my reiki distance symbol and when my mind wanders I chant this symbol softly to myself over and over until my focus is stronger.

Everyone does this is their own way it’s just about finding what u feel in your heart works best for you