Research Studies into Reflexology

Reflexology

Impact of Reflexology on the Workplace Danish Study 1 A reflexologist was hired by a Scandinavian airline’s cargo department to improve staff morale and reduce sick leave for its 60 employees, resulting in monthly savings of US$3,300. This is what their employees said:

“Our work is done through computers and people spending many hours in a chair doing their work, resulting in aching shoulders and back. Since we employed our reflexologist we have experienced a substantial decrease of people being ill and away from work. It has had a physical and psychological effect. There is a much better atmosphere in the department, because the employees feel there is something being done about their problems. Before staff used to stay at home, now we see them go to work anyway because they know they can get a treatment and feel better.” (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Danish Study 2 The Odense Postal District employed a reflexologist for 3 years to deal with employee stress. Two hundred and thirty five employees participated resulting in a 25% fall in sick leave, saving £110,000 and 170 employees reported a good impact on their health. (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Danish Study 3 A reflexologist was employed for 6 months. 52 employees (all women) were treated for various ailments. Sick leave fell by 65.9% 97.5% had a positive effect on their primary problem 77.5% had a positive effect on their secondary problem They had a 27.5% reduction in medication. (Research has been published and undertaken by the FDZ – the Danish Reflexology Association)

Headaches and Migraines
The National Board of Health Study, Denmark This widescale study was commissioned in Denmark since there were 729,000 lost workdays in 1994 from migraines. The results showed that 19% of headache sufferers stopped taking medication following reflexology work. They found that reflexology treatments had a beneficial effect on patients suffering from migraine and tension headaches.

The study was conducted at the Department of Social Pharmacy, The Royal Danish School of Pharmacy in co-operation with 5 reflexology associations. 220 patients participated. The majority had moderate to severe symptoms: 90% had taken prescribed medication for their headaches one month prior to the study (81% was acetvlsalicyclic acid and paracetamol taken twice a week, with 72% of stronger medication taken fortnightly); with 36% experiencing side effects from the medicines. 34% had taken medication for other non-headache ailments.

3 months after completing the reflexology treatments, the results were:

16% had been cured 65% had reduced symptoms 19% reported that they had been able to stop all medication taken before the study. Those participants who continued with reflexology sessions after the six-month period reported the greatest probability for cure. Those who had headaches for the shortest period prior to the study reported the greatest relief after the study. One thing the researchers noticed that may have affected the study was that once receiving reflexology, many of the participants seemed to make lifestyle changes that reflected how they looked at their headaches. Prior to receiving reflexology, patients looked at their headaches as something separate from themselves over which they had no control. After working with a reflexologist, they seemed to understand the mind-body connection to their headache and how it could be controlled through the integration of the mind and body. It appeared that the reflexology practitioner became a catalyst for initiating the learning process and inspiring personal development in the patient. (Brendstrup, Eva and Launs‾, Laila, “Headache and Reflexological Treatment,” The Council Concerning Alternative Treatment, The National Board of Health, Denmark, 1997)

 
Reflexology was found to be as effective in the treatment of headaches as medication (flunarizine), without its side-effects. It was concluded that the reflexology treatment may be classified as an alternative non-pharmacological therapeutic treatment that would be particularly appropriate to those patients that were unable to follow pharmacological treatment. (Lafuente A et al (1990). Effekt der Reflex zonenbehandlung am FuB bezuglich der prophylaktischen Behandlung mit Flunarizin bei an Cephalea-Kopfschmerzen leidenden Patieten.Erfahrungsheilkunde. 39, 713-715.)

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Chinese Study A Chinese study of 26 patients, 9 men and 17 women, from 19 to 43 years of age showed that after one session of foot reflexology, 13 of the participants considered themselves symptom free, and 1 reported symptoms relieved. After two sessions, 6 considered themselves to be cured and 1 reported to be symptom free. After three sessions, 2 participants said they were cured and 3 stated their symptoms were unchanged. The conclusion of this study was that reflexology is a safe, economic therapy.
Gynaecological Problems • Pre-menstrual syndrome • Various gynaecological disorders • Menopausal Symptoms • Amenorrhea • Male Impotence • Dymenstruation/(painful periods) • Hypermenorrhea/(excessive uterine bleeding)

Diabetes
Chinese Study 1 32 cases of type II diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into 2 groups. One group was treated with conventional Western Medicine hypoglycemic agent and reflexology, the other group with the same medicine only (WM).

After daily treatments over 30 days, fasting blood glucose levels, platelet aggregation, length and wet weight of the thrombus, senility symptom scores and serum lipid peroxide (LPO) were greatly reduced in the reflexology group (P,0.05-0.01), while no significant change was observed in the WM group.

The study suggested that reflexology was an effective treatment for type II diabetes mellitis. (Wang, X. M., “Type II diabetes mellitus with foot reflexotherapy,” Chuang Koh Chuang Hsi I Chief Ho Teas Chi, Beijing , Vol. 13, Sept. 1993, pp 536-538)

Chinese Study 2 22 cases with non-insulin dependent diabetes were split into 2 groups. The patients of both groups had taken hypoglycemic agents for a long time. Reflexology was provided daily for 30 days. Results: The indexes of the scores of senility, thrombocyte aggregation rates (TAR), the length and wet weights of thrombosis in vitro, and the serum oxidative lipids were measured to judge curative effect.

The results were so positive that the researchers recommend that further research using larger numbers of patients in controlled clinical trials into the effectiveness of reflexology in alleviating pain, nausea and anxiety in the management of these symptoms by the family at home is warranted. (Foot Massage: A nursing intervention to modify the distressing symptoms of pain and nausea in patients hospitalized with cancer,” Grealish, L. Lomasney, A., Whiteman, B., Cancer Nurse 2000, June;23(3):237-43 (On-line review: “Reflexology Used for Cancer Patients,” Internet Health Library, October 11, 2000)

Cancer (Quality of life) Results: 100% of the reflexology group benefited from an improvement in quality of life: appearance, appetite, breathing, communication (doctors), communication (family), communication (nurses), concentration, constipation, diarrhoea, fear of future, isolation, micturition, mobility, mood, nausea, pain, sleep and tiredness. An improvement in all components of the quality of life scale was reported in the reflexology group compared to 67. 5 in the placebo group. This study suggests that the provision of reflexology for palliative patients within the general setting could be beneficial. Not only did the patients in this study enjoy the intervention, they were also ‘relaxed,’ comforted’ and achieved relief from some of their symptoms. (Hodgson, H. “Does reflexology impact on cancer patients’ quality of life?,” Nursing Standard, 14, 31, p. 33-38)

Cancer (Anxiety and pain) Results: Foot reflexology alleviated anxiety and pain for 23 patients with breast and lung cancer. Researchers noted a significant decrease in anxiety for patients diagnosed with breast or lung cancer and a significant decrease in pain for patients with breast cancer. “This has important implications for nursing practice as both professionals and lay people can be taught reflexology. Reflexology is a simple technique for human touch which can be performed anywhere, requires no special equipment, is non-invasive and does not interfere with patients’ privacy.” (Stephenson, N. L., Weinrich, S. P. and Tavakoli, A. S., “The effects of foot reflexology on anxiety and pain in patients with breast and lung cancer,” OncolNursForum 2000, Jan.-Feb.;27(1):67-72)

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Parkinsons and CBD Oils

CBD for Parkinsons

 

Patients turn to cannabis

It’s little wonder then that Parkinson’s sufferers and their families, desperate to slow down the course of the disease and ameliorate the life limiting symptoms, look towards other options. And while, to some, cannabis might seem like a medical wildcard, its use for the disease can be traced back to the 19th Century, where it was described in William Richard Gowers’s “Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System.”

Back then, very little was known about the chemical compounds in the plant.

Indeed, it’s only in the last twenty years that scientists have really begun to understand how cannabis affects the body with the discovery of the endocannabinoid system – the homeostatic regulator comprising a network of receptors (CB1 and CB2) and cannabis-like chemicals, found predominantly in the brain, central nervous and immune system.

The area of the brain affected by Parkinson’s, the basal ganglia, has a high density of CB1 receptors and in experimental Parkinson’s models scientists have observed increased CB1 activity in this brain region. Greater CB2 receptor expression has also been noted in the brain’s glial cells, as well as an overall increase in endocannabinoid production.

Researchers have already seen that botanical cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant can have a direct impact on the endocannabinoid system. It’s no surprise then that an exciting area of research into combating neurodegenerative disease is the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic tools.

 

Key to your decision should be finding CBD oils that are extracted from organic hemp, using state-of-the-art Supercritical CO2 methods. This ensures you that the CBD oil is both free from solvents and that the active compounds like cannabinoids and terpenes are preserved.

Effects of cannabidiol in the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease: an exploratory double-blind trial.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237116

Box Breathing – If its good enough for Navy Seals…

Breathing Techniques

Navy Seals train hard and not just on their bodies but on their minds too.  They have to be able to stay calm in the most frightening of situations.  What if we could learn to do it to so that we can better handle our emotions and our busy over active minds.

Well with practice we can and it is all down to our breathing.  When we are frightened or angry our breathing naturally becomes more rapid and shallow which causes fight or flight response and the more we do this the more we are likely to develop chronic illnesses brought on by this stress response.

Here is how Box Breathing or four square Breathing works

 

Before you get started, make sure that you’re seated upright in a comfortable chair with your feet flat on the floor. Try to be an a stress-free, quiet environment where you can focus on your breathing. Keeping your hands relaxed in your lap with your palms facing up, focus on your posture. You should be sitting up straight. This will help you take deep breaths.

When you’re ready, start with step 1.

Step 1

Sitting upright, slowly exhale, getting all the oxygen out of your lungs. Focus on this intention and be conscious of what you’re doing.

Step 2

Inhale slowly and deeply through your nose to the count of four. In this step, count to four very slowly in your head. Feel the air fill your lungs, one section at a time, until your lungs are completely full and the air moves into your abdomen.

Step 3

Hold your breath for another slow count of four.

Step 4

Exhale through your mouth for the same slow count of four, expelling the air from your lungs and abdomen. Be conscious of the feeling of the air leaving your lungs.

Step 5

Hold your breath for the same slow count of four before repeating this process.

 

Practice anywhere and throughout the day as often as you like or just before you know you are going to feel nervous and this will help to calm you down.

 

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Athletes – Cbd Oil helps recovery

cbd for athletes, cbd oil, nutrition

While using cannabis as pre-workout supplement may sound crazy, it is not uncommon for elite athletes to use cannabis as a recovery tool as well. After an intense workout or training session, you may be tired, sore, or even nauseous. Many people in this situation may toss back two or three Ibuprofen, crack a beer to take the edge off and call it good. However, what you may not realize is that NSAID drugs like Ibuprofen and Aleve are extremely dangerous, especially when used with regularity. If deaths from the toxic effects of NSAID drugs were tabulated separately, these drug toxicities would constitute the 15th most common cause of death in the United States. Therefore, we suggest athletes stick to a more powerful, less toxic, and naturally occurring substance like cannabis. In this guide, we will help you understand the benefits of cannabis as a recovery tool and how to garner these benefits in your own post-workout regimen.

 

Nutrition helps post-workout recovery

Protein

In order to produce our own proteins, we must consume proteins. Protein supplementation, both pre- and post-workout, generally improves recovery, muscle growth and strength2. However, specific amounts and types of protein can promote greater improvements in physical fitness. For example, drinking milk after a workout can promote increases in muscle size and strength while decreasing body fat. To be more specific, the amino acid known as leucine, particularly a dose of 3-4 grams, can promote maximum muscle gain. However, fast-acting carbohydrates such as glucose are needed because the release of insulin that follows carbohydrate intake promotes tissue growth.

Carbs

Carbohydrate intake after intense exercise3 is also essential in order to replenish stores of energy that may have been exhausted, preferably within one hour after finishing. Of course, rehydration should never be overlooked after intense exercise. This includes both water and electrolytes such as sodium, which reduce urine losses and are needed for cellular functions, but are lost in significant amounts through sweat. Approximately 25-50% more water than what has been lost through sweat is required for proper rehydration, and this should be taken within 4-6
hours after exercise.

Post-Workout Recovery Tips using Hemp & Cannabidiol

But where can hemp and cannabinoids play a role in post-exercise recovery?  Some cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and painkilling (analgesic) effects. This is relevant because strenuous exercise increases oxidative stress4 and therefore inflammation, while moderate antioxidant supplementation may reduce the damage.  In pre-clinical research, CBD was found to be a stronger antioxidant than vitamin C or E5, able to protect cells against damage caused by reactive oxygen molecules. However, isolated CBD has been found to only exert anti-inflammatory and painkilling effects in a limited dose range6.

In fact, another cannabinoid known as cannabigerol7 (CBG) has been shown to reduce inflammatory markers and increase levels of one of the body’s own antioxidants, superoxide dismutase.

Besides the cannabinoids, terpenoids8 present in hemp extracts also possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic abilities. Additionally, the terpenoid myrcene is recognised as a sleep aid and may be a muscle relaxant, which could help athletes rest after intensive exercise. Alpha-pinene has been found to help dilate (widen) airways, which may increase oxygen supply and therefore aid clearance of lactic acid and tissue repair. However, while whole hemp extracts look like a promising aid to post-exercise recovery, they should be used alongside standard recommendations of rest, rehydration and nutrition.


References

  1. Tortora, GJ & Derrickson, B, 2012, Principles of Anatomy & Physiology, 13th edn, Wiley
  2. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1550-2783-9-54/fulltext.html
  3. http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/competition_and_training/recovery_nutrition
  4. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Antoni_Aguilo/publication/5293501_Influence_of_an_Antioxidant_Vitamin-Enriched_Drink_on_Pre-_and_Post-Exercise_Lymphocyte_Antioxidant_System/links/0deec5320e4793680a000000.pdf
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC20965/
  6. http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=53912
  7. http://www.medicinalgenomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/CBG_Colitis.pdf
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3165946/