Dr Joe Dispenza Guided Meditation

meditation

The purpose of meditation is to slow down your brain waves and get beyond the thinking, analytical mind. What I want you to understand is that you already know how to do this, because you do it every day.

If you can begin your practice with the understanding that all you’re doing is relaxing your body (just like when you’re falling asleep) while keeping your mind conscious and awake—and if you can continuously move deeper into this state of relaxation while focusing on nothing (or not thinking)—you’ve just opened the doorway between the conscious and subconscious mind.

Your Past does Not Define You

meditation, Rewiring the Brain, The mind

Your PAST doesn’t define you.
What you do NOW defines you!

If you study the habits and traits of highly successful people, and the average or unsuccessful it is impossible not to see clear differences in their habits and thinking…
One of the biggest differences lie in THINKING and LIVING in the PAST, or planning into the FUTURE.

The majority, and by that i mean the average and underachieving among us, think PRIMARILY in the past.

“this is what happened to me, and if this didn’t happen to me i would be where i want to be today”
“i should have done this in the past, and now it’s too late”
“this person wronged me in the past, and that’s why I’m not where i want to be”

 

Living in the moment is not always easy. Sometimes our thoughts are overwhelmed by regrets about past events or anxiety about the future, which can make it hard to enjoy the present. If you are having a hard time living in the moment, there are some simple strategies that may help. There are little things that you can do throughout your day, such as creating a mindfulness cue, learning to meditate, and performing random acts of kindness

The successful one however thinks ONLY in THE NOW and into the FUTURE
THEY SET GOALS INTO THE FUTURE. Clear targets to push them forward… To light their fire within and give them PASSION for living.
THEY VISUALIZE THE RESULTS coming to reality into the future…

They see the FUTURE reward, not the initial struggle to bring it to life.
NOT ‘what i have to go through to get there’ but ‘How will i feel when i get there’!
And the only way to get to the future, to the big reward, is to have powerful action in the NOW. In this powerful present moment.

All successful people know that each positive and productive present moment leads to a positive and successful FUTURE moment.

Use your past as fuel to take you wherever you need to go!
If you ever look back, make sure it is only to DRIVE YOU FORWARD!

Don’t blame others for YOUR situation. Rely on YOURSELF to create a new situation.

Your FUTURE starts TODAY not tomorrow. Plan now, live now!

Don’t let your PAST define YOUR FUTURE!
Don’t you dare let PAST failures get in the way of your FUTURE success!

 

It doesn’t matter what happened in the past. The only thing that matters is what you are going to do RIGHT NOW! What are you going to do right now?!

 

A great article about living in the moment  –

http://paidtoexist.com/how-to-live-fully-in-the-present/

 

Tom Bilyeu -Defeat the Weak Voice

Inspiring people, The mind

Tom Bilyeu is an American entrepreneur best known as a co-founder of billion dollar brand Quest Nutrition, at one time the second fastest growing private company in North America. Tom is now a self-development speaker and founder of Impact Theory.

I love to listen to his show Impact Theory on Youtube, when your feeling a little down or like your life is going no where fast then listen to him and his guests and you are sure to be fired up with the level of wisdom and sheer motivational words that are in each and every interview.

A few tips from him are below and have a watch of his video..

1. Don’t ask what’s the least you can do. Ask what’s the most you can bear.

The standards you set for your effort determine the kind of results you’ll get. There’s no secret ingredient. You have to do the work.

2. Dissect how you spend your time. It reveals your priorities.

Look where you spend your attention. Are you always distracted on social media or entertainment websites? Are you focused on mega success or temporary comfort?

3. It’s about identity. Be the kind of person that gets things done. Even when it’s hard.

Tony Robbins agrees that the strongest force in the world is to act in accordance with your self-image, your identity. How to change that? Draw a line in your mind and DECIDE to be known as the hardest worker in your circle from this point forward.

4. Confidence is deciding you’re unstoppable. Not that you’ll never fail. – Tom Bilyeu

We gain confidence from taking action, take the first step today the momentum you gain will grow each day until you are unstoppable. Do not fear failure do you think anyone who has achieved great success looks back on their small failures and cries about it? No in fact they are GRATEFUL for their mistakes, because they know that is where grew the most in momentum and knowledge.

5. The level of effort you tolerate from yourself will define your life.

Some people find reasons to work less, others find reasons to work more. The results, unfortunately, reflect your efforts, not your reasons.

6. Don’t let joy be an accident. Create it.

Make conscious choices to create joy. Do the things you love more often. Work towards something you love. Passion makes hard work seem easy.

7. What price are you willing to pay for greatness?

Greatness comes from sacrificing comfort. You have too get the time wasters out of your life binge watching TV, going out every weekend, social media what is it that you waste time on? Change your habits. Change your life.

8. If you look for the negative, it will be there. If you look for the positive, it will OVERWHELM you.

People can talk themselves into action, but they can also talk themselves in to quitting. What are you talking yourself into right now?

9. The way to build a big business is to take care of people.

Respect is not given it is earned.

10. If you really want to cut through the noise, you’re going to have to outperform everyone else. – Tom Bilyeu

To achieve extraordinary results, you have to put in extraordinary effort.

 

Go and subscribe to his Youtube channel and watch a different one each day to improve yourself and keep on the right tracks to develop a stronger mindset.

David Goggins – toughest man alive

Inspiring people, mind hacking
 I love to read, listen and find out about people who overcome great struggle and defy the odds.  They are no different to you or me, so how do they build that inner strength and where do they get that drive to keep going when things get tough.  What makes them superhuman?
                                                                
David Goggins is the toughest man alive.

There’s no doubt about it. Goggins is the only member of the US Armed Forces to complete SEAL training, US Army Ranger School, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller training.

 

Any of those accomplishments alone would have been impressive, but that’s not all.

He’s also the current Guinness record holder for the most number of pull-ups done in 24 hours. Alongside that record are multiple first-place finishes at the most brutal ultra-endurance events, which attracts the toughest competitors from around the world.

How does someone consistently push himself to his physical and mental limits all the time?

Let’s find out.

Lesson 1: Purpose Trumps Motivation

David Goggins doesn’t believe in motivation. In his own words, “Motivation is crap. Motivation comes and goes.”

Purpose, on the other hand, is something that Goggins can get behind.

After some of his fellow SEALs were killed in a military operation, Goggins signed up for the San Diego One Day, which was a 24-hour race where competitors would run as many miles as they could. His intention was to use this race as a qualifier for future ultramarathons, which would allow him to raise money for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation. For this race to count, he would have to run at least 100 miles in 24 hours.

The problem?

Goggins was not a runner at all. Weighing anywhere from 240 – 270 lbs, Goggins was a big man who was into powerlifting more than anything else. That bulk had served him well in the SEALs, but it was unheard of for anyone at that size to participate in long distance runs. Heck, he hadn’t put on running shoes at all in the past year.

And yet, he somehow made it to the 70-mile mark within the first 12-13 hours. But the process had been brutal; Goggins got this far only through sheer force of will.

Goggins was in a bad place. All the metatarsal bones in his feet were broken. There were stress fractures, shin splints, and muscles tearing. He was peeing blood down his leg because he couldn’t make it to a toilet 20 feet from him.

He was on the brink of death, but he didn’t quit. He went on slowly to finish the race, finishing the 100 miles well within the allocated 24 hours.

How did he do it? Was it the mental strength that came from his cause? It would seem that way, but that’s not what really happened:

“Everyone asks me, were you thinking about the guys that died at that time? I’m not gonna lie; I wasn’t. This became a personal thing, this became me against this race; me against the kids that called me nigger; me against me. It just became something I took so violently personal.”

Even after finishing Navy SEAL and Ranger school training, the 100-mile race was the toughest challenge Goggins had faced yet.

Pain obliterates our ability to think and function. But David Goggins was fuelled by a purpose greater than himself, something more compelling than that pain.

It turns out that you can still keep going if you have such a purpose.

Lesson 2: Deconstruct Things

So how exactly did Goggins power through the remaining 30 miles?

“I broke this thing down into small pieces. I said I got to get nutrition; I got to be able to stand up before I can go through the 30 miles […] I taped up my ankles, and then my feet, and that’s how I got through that race”

It’s an experience the SEAL would likely never forget.

This lesson of mental deconstruction has its roots in a process that all Navy SEALs must go through — hell week. It’s the toughest period of SEAL training; trainees are put through 125 hours of continuous training, and typically get only two hours of sleep during that period. They’re constantly cold, wet, and miserable.

The idea is to drain the trainees physically and mentally, and then see what sort of decisions they make. Instructors do their best to make trainees ring the bell, which is used to announce that they’re quitting. Nobody holds back here.

David Goggins went through 3 hell weeks — all in a span of a year.

Rolled over from his previous two classes first due to illness and then to injury, he was given one last chance to complete SEAL training. Goggins did just that, focusing on one challenge at a time. He would eventually graduate in this final attempt.

Broken down into small pieces, there’s no obstacle that is insurmountable. We find that there’s always step that’s actionable. Add up the small bits, and we would’ve accomplished something we never thought possible.

One step at a time is how 100-mile marathons get completed.

Just like in life, we get overwhelmed with things when we look to far ahead, the end goal seems so far away that we just give up.  Instead look only at today and what ACTION you can take today to get nearer to your goals.

Lesson 3: Remember The 40% Rule

Unbeknownst to Goggins, Jesse Itzler was participating in the same San Diego One Day race as well. The only difference was that he had participated with a six-man relay team.

Intrigued by how Goggins had manically completed the race despite his brutal injuries, Itzler invited the SEAL to live with him for a month. He wanted to learn more about the man that had finished a race despite being so ill-prepared. Goggins agreed with one condition: Itzler would do anything he said, no matter what.

On the first day, Itzler was made to do a hundred pull-ups.

Itzler did eight on his first set, then six, and then fewer still. His arms were aching, but Goggins wouldn’t relent. He stood and watched as Itzler struggled, doing one pull-up at a time.

Itzler would finish his repetitions. As he recalls in Living with a Seal:

“He [Goggins] showed me, proved to me right there that there was so much more, we’re all capable of so much more than we think we are. […] He would say that when your mind is telling you you’re done, you’re really only 40 percent done”

Research suggests that statement – the 40% rule – has some truth. We are often physically more capable than we perceive ourselves to be. For instance, researchers found that subjects who were given a placebo but told it was caffeine were able to lift significantly more weight than those who were really given caffeine.

There’s a reserve tank within us that we never really tap on. Only by pushing ourselves to our limits — and then breaking them — can we reach our full potential.

I personally find this with Kundalini Yoga, when it gets so hard its very easy and to give up but we do not want to programme our neural pathways into believing that we are weaker than we are.  So breathe through the pain and know you can go further than the monkey mind tells you.

Lesson 4: Mental Visualisation

David Goggins believes that he’s the toughest man on the planet. He thinks that he can complete virtually any task set before him.

He probably can. But the point is that you have to see yourself accomplishing something before it really happens. The mind has to conceive it before the body can achieve it.

The question he asks himself in times of struggle contains only two simple words: “what if?”

When he first walked into the Navy SEAL recruiter’s office, Goggins was told that there were only 35 African-Americans in the past 70 years who had made it through. Goggins asked himself — “what if I could be the 36th?”

These days, he asks himself the same question whenever he’s struggling through a run. It’s this question that helps him get through when his body and mind are broken and begging for him to stop.

Seeing himself succeed and do the impossible gives him the shivers. That drives him to attack every day and challenge with a vengeance.

                                                       

Lesson 5: Use Your Cookie Jar

Goggins has a secret weapon that he calls upon when he’s about to break.

Like many others, he has a cookie jar that he reaches into for the occasional treat. But this jar doesn’t contain any of the things you might typically find; there are no Oreos or Chips Ahoy cookies in there.

Instead, it contains every setback he has overcome. He’ll remember that he’s a Navy SEAL, who’s completed hell week three times. He’ll remind himself that he’s been through this pain before – and survived. The obstacle in front of him is nothing compared to what he has faced.

“Even the toughest man, in times of suffering, we forget how tough we really are”

Goggins never dwells on his accomplishments. The only time he revisits them is when he needs extra fuel for a push he’s making. He allows himself to reach into his cookie jar only when there’s a need. It’s never a treat.

This is a fab one, we simply remember and visualise the times when we achieved greatness, when we

Lesson 6: Be Willing To Suffer

You wouldn’t know it, but Goggins hates running.

He hates it with a passion. Growing up, Goggins has always been on the larger side. He loved powerlifting and had the physique to show for it. But in the world of Ultra, such a large frame is virtually unheard of. It was just inefficient to move that much weight over such long distances.

Goggins knew he was going to suffer — that was precisely his plan. That was the only way he was going to raise enough funds for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation.

“People respond to pain. If I go out and wash cars for $10, who gives a damn? People want to see you throw up, cry and go through tremendous suffering.”

But for David Goggins, suffering is not just about raising funds. As he says: “suffering is the true test of life”.

Goggins isn’t training just for a race. He’s training for the tragedies that inevitably strike each and every one of us. He does this so he doesn’t fall apart if he gets the 2 A.M. call from the hospital informing him that his mother has passed away.

In other words, David Goggins is the modern day stoic. But unlike the ancient philosophers who advised that we should periodically embrace suffering, Goggins has actually made suffering a habit.

Strengthen your mind and your resolve by voluntarily putting yourself through situations in which you struggle. Callus your mind the same way you do your hands. Take the path of most resistance every day of your life.

That’s how David Goggins has become the toughest man alive. And according to him, the happiest as well:

“Having lived the life I’ve lived, and having seen the other side, not being afraid to attack what was in front of me, has made me happy.”

Superfood – CBD Hemp – Preventative

cbd oil, nutrition

People start finding out about CBD oil mainly due to the fact that they are in pain either mentally or physically.  Normally people have tried almost everything and are at the end of their tether when they come across CBD oils.  But what a lot of people don’t know is that CBD mixed with pure hemp oil is actually an amazing superfood.  I have been a vegetarian since I was 10 and have gone through stages of  my life when I have been a very unhealthy anaemic junk food vegetarian.  When health problems arose I looked into ways to make myself feel better.  I have added a variety of health food, superfood, supplements into my diet over the years and came across CBD oils.  The more I research into the oils the more I find out about the most amazing benefits.

CBD Hemp Oil is considered to be a Super Food – it offers a complete full spectrum of natural proteins, with all 20 amino acids used by the human body, including all eight essential amino acids. It contains the perfect ratio of omega fatty acids 3, 6 & 9. CBD Hemp has high levels of enzymes, fiber, vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C, D, and E and is rich in essential minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron, magnesium, manganese, and phosphorus. CBD is packed full of natural carotenes, flavonoids, ketones, nitrogenous compounds and terpenes.
There are more than 500 trace compounds in hemp working synergistically together with CBD to render its powerful nutrition. Scientists call this “the entourage effect.” So there is no single magic constituent standing alone that gives CBD hemp its myriad of health values. Each compound in CBD full spectrum CBD oil plays off of another and this is what makes this cannabis plant so special.

 

 

CTFO CBD hemp oil does not contain the intoxicating cannabinoid called THC. – This is a misconception. Since hemp only has a trace amount of THC, it’s not enough to make it illegal or get someone high. HempWorx CBD hemp oil is extracted and tested to have less than <.3% THC content, which is so negligible it cannot produce a high. And because of this negligible THC count, this renders CBD hemp oil legal in all 50 states. Taking CBD hemp oil will not give a positive reading for marijuana on a drug test. So this is another reason why CBD hemp oil is so popular.

Kyle Cease – brings comedy to consciousness

meditation, mind hacking, Rewiring the Brain, The mind

Omg where the helk has this guy been hiding or have I simply not been in alignment with him or am I only ready now to hear his words.

So I’ve been meditating for few years now and slowly uncovering all the darkness within me and bringing it into the light. It’s not easy confronting fears, even the ones I made up in my head which is practically all of them.

Eckharte tolle the power of now opened up my eyes to my journey into developing my consciousness and mindfulness practice along with Jon kabat zinn work on MBSR.

But Kyle Cease seems to combine all these teachings with great humour. There is so many AHA moments followed by laughter and then some more self realisation.

I am just so grateful that I am finding these truly amazing people and their words are like gold.

Please, if you are into developing your inner self and wanting to know more about the mind and well life in general then listen to this guy.. I can’t even explain how fantastic he really is.

Script for Mountain Meditation

meditation

Guided Mountain Meditation
Sit with a straight back, your head held erect on your neck and shoulders, allow the shoulders to fully relax. And place your hands on your knees.
Close your eyes and bring your attention to the flow of your breathing. Feeling each inbreath and each outbreath. Just observing your breathing without trying to change it or regulate it in any way. Allowing the body to be still. And sitting with a sense of dignity, a sense of resolve, a sense of being complete, whole, in this very moment, with your posture reflecting this sense of wholeness.
And as you sit here, picturing in your mind’s eye as best you can the most beautiful mountain that you know or have seen or can imagine. Just holding the image and feeling of this mountain in your mind’s eye, letting it gradually come into greater focus. Observing its overall shape, its lofty peak high in the sky, the large base rooted in the rock of the earth’s crust, its steep or gently sloping sides. Noticing how massive it is, how solid, how unmoving, how beautiful both from afar and up close.
Perhaps your mountain has snow at the top and trees on the lower slopes. Perhaps it has one prominent peak, perhaps a series of peaks or a high plateau. Whatever its shape or appearance, just sitting and breathing with the image of this mountain. Observing it, noticing its qualities and when you feel ready, seeing if you can bring the mountain into your own body so that the body sitting here and the mountain in your mind’s eye become one. So that as you sit here you share in the massiveness and the stillness and majesty of the mountain. You become the mountain rooted in the sitting posture, your head becomes the lofty peak, supported by the rest of the body. Your shoulders and arms the sides of the mountain. Your buttocks and legs the solid base rooted to your chair. Experiencing in your body a sense of uplift from deep within your pelvis and spine, with each breath as you continue sitting, becoming a little more a breathing mountain, unwavering in your stillness, completely what you are, beyond words and thought. A centred, rooted, unmoving presence.
Now as you sit here becoming aware of the fact that as the sun travels across the sky, the light and shadows and colours are changing virtually moment by moment. Night follows day and day follows night. A canopy of stars, the moon, then the sun. Through it all, the mountain just sits, experiencing change in each moment. Constantly changing, yet always just being itself. It remains still as the seasons flow into one another and as the weather changes, moment by moment, and day by day. Calmness abiding all change.
In summer, there’s no snow on the mountain except perhaps for the very peaks. In fall, the mountain may wear a coat of brilliant fire colours. In winter, a blanket of snow and ice. In any season, it may find itself at times enshrouded in clouds or fog or pelted by freezing rain. People may come to see the mountain and comment on how beautiful it is or on how it’s not a good day to see the mountain. None of this matters to the mountain which remains at all times its essential self. Clouds may come, and clouds may go. The mountain’s magnificence and beauty are not changed one bit by the way people see it or not or by the weather. Seen or unseen, in sun or clouds, broiling or frigid, day or night, it just sits, being itself. At times, visited by violent storms, buffeted by snow and rain and winds of unthinkable magnitude. Through it all, the mountain continues to sit unmoved by the weather, by what happens on the surface, by the world of appearances.
And in the same way, as we sit in meditation, we can learn to experience the mountain. We can embody the same unwavering stillness and rootedness in the face of everything that changes in our own lives over seconds, over hours, over years. In our lives and in our meditation practice, we constantly experience the changing nature of mind and body and of the outer world. We have our own periods of light and darkness, our moments of colour and our moments of drabness. Certainly, we experience storms of varying intensity and violence in the outer world and in our own minds and bodies. We endure periods of darkness and pain, as well as the moments of joy. Even our appearance changes constantly, experiencing a weather of its own.
By becoming the mountain in our meditation practice, we can link up with its strength and stability and adopt it for our own. We can use its energies to support our energy to encounter each moment with mindfulness and equanimity and clarity. It may help us to see that our thoughts and feelings, our preoccupations, our emotional storms and crises, even the things that happen to us, are very much like the weather on the mountain. We tend to take it all personally but its strongest characteristic is impersonal. The weather of our own lives is not to be ignored or denied. It is to be encountered, honoured, felt, known for what it is and held in awareness. And in holding it in this way, we come to know a deeper silence, and stillness, and wisdom. Mountains have this to teach us and much more if we can come to listen.
Reference: Mindfulness Meditation, CD Series 2, Jon Kabat-Zinn

Script for Awareness of Breath

meditation, The mind

Awareness of Breath

This guided meditation on the breath will help you learn to simply be and to look within yourself with mindfulness and equanimity. Allow yourself to switch from the usual mode of doing to a mode of non-doing. Of simply being. Sitting in an erect posture, either on a straight back chair or on a cushion. As you allow your body to become still, bring your attention to the fact that you are breathing. And become aware of the movement of your breath as it comes into your body and as it leaves your body. Not manipulating the breath in any way or trying to change it. Simply being aware of it and of the feelings associated with breathing. And observing the breath deep down in your belly. Feeling the abdomen as it expands gently on the in breath, and as it falls back towards your spine on the outbreath. Being totally here in each moment with each breath. Not trying to do anything, not trying to get any place, simply being with your breath. Giving full care and attention to each inbreath and to each outbreath. As they follow one after the other in a never ending cycle and flow.
You will find that from time to time your mind will wander off into thoughts. When you notice that your attention is no longer here and no longer with your breathing, and without judging yourself, bring your attention back to your breathing and ride the waves of your breathing, fully conscious of the duration of each breath from moment to moment. Every time you find your mind wandering off the breath, gently bringing it back to the present, back to the moment-to-moment observing of the flow of your breathing. Using your breath as an anchor to focus your attention, to bring you back to the present whenever you notice that your mind is becoming absorbed or reactive. Using your breath to help you tune into a state of relaxed awareness and stillness.
Now as you observe your breathing, you may find from time to time that you are becoming aware of sensations in your body. As you maintain awareness of your breathing, see if it is possible to expand the field of your awareness so that it includes a sense of your body as a whole as you sit here. Feeling your body, from head to toe, and becoming aware of all the sensations in your body. So that now you are observing not only the flow of breathing, but the sense of your body as a whole.
Being here with whatever feelings and sensations come up in any moment without judging them, without reacting to them, just being fully here, fully aware. Totally present with whatever your feelings are and with your breath and a sense of your body as a whole. And again whenever you notice that your mind wandering off, just bringing it back to your breathing and your body as you sit here not going anywhere, not doing anything just simply being, simply sitting. Moment to moment, being fully present, fully with yourself.
Reestablishing your awareness on the body as a whole and on the breath as it moves in and out of your body. Coming back to a sense of fullness of each inbreath, and the fullness of each outbreath. If you find yourself at any point drawn into a stream of thinking and you notice that you are no longer observing the breath, just using your breathing and the sense of your body to anchor you and stabilize you in the present.
Just being with your breathing from moment to moment, just sitting in stillness, looking for nothing and being present to all. Just as it is, just as it unfolds. Just being right here, right now. Complete. Human. Whole.

As the practice comes to an end, you might give yourself credit for having spent this time nourishing yourself in a deep way by dwelling in this state of non-doing, in this state of being. For having intentionally made time for yourself to simply be who you are. And as you move back into the world, allow the benefits of this practice to expand into every aspect of your life.
Reference: Mindfulness Meditation, CD Series 1, Jon Kabat-Zinn

Script for BodyScan Meditation

meditation

Guided Body Scan

This guided body scan meditation is intended to help you enter a very deep state of relaxation. It is best if you can manage to stay awake throughout the entire exercise. It’s important to remember to not try to relax. This will just create tension. What you’ll be doing instead is becoming aware of each passing moment and just accepting what is happening within you, seeing it as it is. Let go of the tendency of wanting things to be different from how they are now and allow things to be exactly as you find them. Just watch the activity of your mind, letting go of judgmental and critical thoughts when they arise, and just doing what the exercise guides you to do as best you can.
Lie down in a warm and private place, dressed in loose and comfortable clothing at a time when you will not be interrupted. Closing your eyes, and letting your arms lie alongside your body, your feet falling away from each other and slowly bringing your attention to the fact that you are breathing. Not trying to control your breath in any way but simply experiencing it as the air moves in and out of your body and noticing your abdomen and feeling the sensations there as your breath comes into your body and your abdomen gently expands. Then noticing your belly deflate as the breath comes out of your body. And following the rhythmic movement of each breath…the rising of your belly on the inbreath and on each outbreath just letting go, letting your body become heavy as it sinks a little bit deeper into relaxation. Just bringing full attention to each breath in each moment.
Now bringing your attention to your feet, becoming aware of whatever sensations are there. If you are registering a blank as you tune in, then just experiencing nothing. And as you breathe in, imagine your breath moving all the way down to your feet and then when you reach your feet, begin your outbreath and let it move all the way up your body and out your nose. So that you’re breathing in from your nose and breathing out from your feet. And when you are ready, letting your feet dissolve in your mind’s eye. Become aware of the shins and calf muscles and the sensations in the lower legs, not just on the surface but right down into the bones, experiencing and accepting what you feel here and breathing into it, then breathing out from it. Then letting go of your lower legs as you relax into the bed or mat. And moving now into the thighs and if there’s any tension just noticing that. Breathing into and out from the thighs. Then letting your thighs dissolve and relax.
Shift your attention to your pelvis now. From one hip to the other. Noticing your buttocks in contact with the bed or the mat. And the sensations of contact and of weight. Becoming aware of the region of the genitals. And whatever sensations or lack of sensations you are experiencing. And directing your breath down into your pelvis, breathing with the entirety of your pelvis. And as you breath out, moving the breath back up through your body and out your nose, letting your pelvis soften and release all tension as you sink even deeper into a state of relaxed awareness and stillness. Totally present in each moment. Content to just be, and to just be right here as you are right now. Direct your attention now to your lower back. And just experiencing your back as it is. Letting your breath penetrate and move into every part of your lower back on the in-breath. And on the out-breath, just letting any tension, any tightness, any holding on just flow out as much as it will. And then letting go of your lower back. And moving up into your upper back now. Just feeling the sensations in your upper back. You may even feel your ribcage, in back as well as in front, expand on the in-breath. And any tightness, fatigue or discomfort in this part of your body, just letting them dissolve and move out with the outbreath as you let go and sink even deeper into stillness and relaxation.
And now shifting your attention to your belly again and experiencing the rising and falling of your belly as you breathe. Feeling the movements of your diaphragm, that umbrella-like muscle that separates your belly from your chest. And experiencing the chest as it expands on the in-breath and deflates on the out-breath. And if you can, tune into the rhythmic beating of your heart within your chest. Feeling it if you can. As well as the lungs expanding on either side of your heart. Just experiencing your chest, your belly, as you lie here…the muscles on the chest wall, the breasts, the entirety of the front of your body. And now just letting this region dissolve into relaxation as well.
Moving your attention now to your fingertips and to both hands together, just becoming aware of the sensations now in the tips of your fingers and thumbs where you may feel some pulsations from the blood flow, a dampness or a warmth or whatever you feel. Just feeling your fingers. And expand your awareness to include the palms of your hands and the backs of your hands and your wrists. And here again perhaps picking up the pulsations of the arteries in your wrists as the blood flows to and from your hands. And becoming aware as well of the forearms. And the elbows. Any and all sensations regardless of what they are. Allowing the field of your awareness to include now the upper arms. Right up to your shoulders. Just experiencing your shoulders and if there are any tensions, breathing into your shoulders and arms. And letting that tension dissolve as you breathe out. Letting go of the tension and letting go of your arms. All the way from your fingertips, right through to your shoulders. As you sink even deeper into a state of relaxed awareness. Just being present in each moment. Letting go of whatever thoughts come up or whatever impulses to move and just experiencing yourself in this moment.
And now focus your attention on your neck and throat and feel this part of your body, experiencing what it feels like perhaps when you swallow and when you breathe. And then letting it go. Letting it relax and dissolve in your mind’s eye. Becoming aware of your face now. Focusing on the jaw and the chin, just experiencing them as they are.
Becoming aware of your lips and your mouth. And becoming aware of your cheeks now…and your nose, feeling the breath as it moves in and out at the nostrils. And be aware of your eyes. And the entire region around your eyes and eyelids. And if there’s any tension, letting it leave as the breath leaves. And now the forehead, letting it soften to let go of stored emotions. And the temples. And if you sense any emotion associated with the tension or feelings in your face, just being aware of that. Breathing in and letting the face dissolve into relaxation and stillness. And now become aware of your ears, and back and top of your head. Now letting your whole face and head relax. For now, just letting it be as it is. Letting it be still and neutral. Relaxed and at peace.
Now letting your breath move through your entire body in whatever way feels natural for you. Through the entire length of your body. All of your muscles in a deep state of relaxation. And your mind simply aware of this energy, of this flow of breath. Experiencing your entire body breathing. Sinking deeper and deeper into a state of stillness and deep relaxation. Allow yourself to feel whole. In touch with your essential self in a realm of silence, of stillness, of peace. And seeing that this stillness is in itself healing. And allowing the world to be as it is beyond your personal fears and concerns. Beyond the tendencies of your mind to want everything to be a certain way. Seeing yourself as complete right now as you are. As totally awake right now.
As the exercise ends, bring your awareness back to your body again, feeling the whole of it. You may want to wiggle your toes and fingers. Allow this calmness and this centeredness to remain with you when you move. Congratulate yourself on having taken the time to nourish yourself in this way. And remember that this state of relaxation and clarity is accessible to you by simply paying attention to your breath in any moment, no matter what’s happening in your day. Let your breath be a source of constant strength and energy for you.
Reference: Mindfulness Meditation, CD Series 1, Jon Kabat-Zinn

A Mindful game

meditation

As I was trying to meditate in my peaceful room I was interrupted by my eldest child who wanted to play a game before bed, then later by my younger child who was meant to be in bed but had gotten out to look for a toy coconut from the film Moana that he had been playing with the other day! (Which could mean last year and could possibly be anywhere, but he just must have it right now or I’m afraid he may self combust).

So I asked them if they wanted to play a game, involving a stop watch, a stone and a pen and paper. If they promised to go bed right after.

So I called it ‘No thought stopwatch’ and the rules are –

Watch the stone and when a thought comes into your head write a cross under your name on the pad. The person with the least crosses wins.

Wow..I can’t believe they are actually doing this. I’m always asking them to come and meditate with me and they moan and say it’s boring.

Mohahahaha well I got the last laugh here, as they hadn’t even realised they were meditating.  Afterwords I explained how people have anywhere between 50,000 amd 70,000 thoughts per day which works out to about 48 thoughts per minute. So they did amazing to only have 11 thoughts in the space of ten minutes.